• Tuesday, October 08, 2019 03:00 AM
    Sinus Infections: What You Need to Know
    SATURDAY, Oct. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Along with the flu[1], this is the time of year for sinus infections[2] with their make-you-miserable stuffy, runny noses and blocked ears.Most sinus infections[3] are caused by viruses[4], but bacteria can also be to blame, according to Dr. Jessica Grayson, an assistant professor of otolaryngology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham."When people say they have sinus pressure, they may mean nasal congestion[5]," Grayson said in a university news release. "Bilateral congestion could mean a person has a viral infection or an allergic reaction[6]. Viral infections don't pick and choose a side."If your ...
  • Monday, September 16, 2019 09:24 PM
    Awareness group helps those with allergy after tick bite
    Nikki Shaw doesn’t remember ever being bitten by a tick, but the Joplin woman said she was getting sick in July 2018.“There were times when my husband had to pick me up off the bathroom floor. I was so sick I couldn’t walk,” Shaw said. “I was having muscle issues, just extreme fatigue, rashes, all of it. Finally, after several doctors and no one knew what was going on, I finally went to an allergist who was here locally and she said, 'I think you have this alpha-gal,' and we did the testing and it came back positive.”Wendy Rich, of ...
  • Wednesday, September 04, 2019 12:09 PM
    People allergic to peanuts may have a new way to protect themselves from severe allergic reactions to accidental peanut exposure. It's called sublingual immunotherapy -- or SLIT -- and it involves putting a miniscule amount of liquefied peanut protein under the tongue, where it is absorbed immediately into the blood stream to desensitize the immune system to larger amounts of peanut protein.Published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the research led by first author Edwin Kim, MD, assistant professor of medicine at the UNC School of Medicine, shows that SLIT could offer patients a safe and effective way ...
  • Monday, August 26, 2019 06:22 PM
    Are your allergies bothering you all of a sudden? Here's why.
    TOWN OF TONAWANDA, N.Y. (WKBW) — It's the great outdoors. It's even better when summer rolls around, but for people with allergies, recently it hasn't been so great."My head hurt a lot. My nose is stuffy," said 10-year-old Sierra Sanders-Fronczack from North Tonawanda. "It's like the cold that won't go away," Dr. Kathleen Donovan, an allergist, said.For some, like Sierra, this is only the beginning for their allergies."This is just the start of mine. I just sneezed once or twice, like yesterday and today," Sierra said.What's the culprit? It's not trees, not grass and not even flowers. It's ragweed and ...
  • Monday, August 26, 2019 04:22 PM
    Allergies are a BIG problem right now
    Are you struggling with allergies right now? If so, you're definitely not alone. The calendar may read August, but allergies are sky high across the region.Even those who don't typically suffer from allergies may be feeling the effects of "secondary allergy season." It begins in mid-August and lasts through the end of September.The allergens being referred to are multiple types of weeds with the "big one" being ragweed[1].  There are two species of ragweed it that are significantly more common than the others: giant ragweed and short ragweed. Both can cause severe allergies.And, unfortunately, it is found in every state except ...
  • Saturday, August 03, 2019 04:45 AM
    Sesame Allergy More Common Than Once Thought, Study Finds
    At least one million children and adults in the United States are allergic to sesame, an ingredient used in everything from hummus to snack bars, researchers reported on Friday.The finding indicates that sesame allergy is more prevalent than previously known[1], although still far less common than peanut allergy. But sesame is not among the allergens that the Food and Drug Administration requires manufacturers to list on food labels[2]. “Sesame allergy is becoming a common allergy in the U.S.,” said Dr. Ruchi S. Gupta, a professor of pediatrics at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago and senior author of the study, which was ...
  • Tuesday, July 23, 2019 09:18 AM
    Nothing to Sneeze At: How Climate Change Could Make Your ...
    Nothing to Sneeze At: How Climate Change Could Make Your Allergies Worse Climate change could make things worse for people who suffer from allergies. Photo: PixabayBy Stephanie StettzSprouting daffodils, magnolias, and cherry blossoms serve as cues to put away puffy coats and say goodbye to winter. But for more than 50 million Americans[1] (myself included), the beautiful flowers also signal something else: the arrival of spring allergy season. Sadly, the sniffles will only get louder. As the world warms, pollen allergies will likely get worse[2].Allergies are the sixth leading cause[3] of chronic illness in the U.S. Pollen can trigger asthma attacks and complicate other respiratory diseases, ...
  • Thursday, June 27, 2019 07:54 PM
    FDA OKs 1st Drug for Sinusitis With Nasal Polyps
    THURSDAY, June 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In what specialists say could be a turning point in care, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first drug to treat chronic sinusitis[1] that involves the growth of polyps within the sinuses[2]. Dupixent[3] (dupilumab) is given by injection every two weeks. It was approved to treat patients with nasal polyps[4] and chronic rhinosinusitis -- defined as a prolonged inflammation[5] of the sinuses[6] and nasal cavity, the FDA said. "Nasal polyps can lead to loss of smell and often patients require surgery to remove the polyps," explained the FDA's Dr. ...
  • Tuesday, June 25, 2019 03:00 AM
    Ruling Backs Airline Passengers With Food Allergies
    FRIDAY, June 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Airlines must permit passengers to preboard in order to wipe down seats as a precaution against food allergies[1], the U.S. Department of Transportation says.The rule includes adults who have food allergies[2] and parents of children with food allergies[3], The New York Times reported.The decision stems from a case in September 2016, when gate agents for American Airlines denied Nicole Mackenzie's request to preboard a flight to clean the area around the seat assigned to her seven-year-old daughter, who has life-threatening nut and seed allergies[4].After the family filed a formal complaint with the Department ...
  • Monday, June 24, 2019 08:19 PM
    Allergy Prevention Project launches aiming to “Nip Allergies in the ...
    The National Allergy Strategy yesterday launched the national roll out of the Food Allergy Prevention Project, known as “Nip Allergies in the Bub”. [1][2][3] The project aims to:  Encourage parents to introduce the common allergy causing foods to their baby within the first year of life; Provide information and support to help parents feed their baby the common allergy causing foods; Provide an information and support line to help answer any questions parents may have about feeding their baby the common allergy causing foods, including questions from health professionals; Provide information and support to help parents manage their baby’s eczema to help prevent food allergy developing; Provide ...
  • Monday, June 10, 2019 11:19 PM
    Allergies or something else? Doctors say allergy symptoms mimic other health problems - KY3
    SPRINGFIELD, Mo.-- If you have allergies, you know the numbers are high. However, allergy symptoms can often mock other health problems. "I experience throat pain, which I'm experiencing right now. Sinus pressure, runny nose, like it's bad," explained Selina Balbenda. However, she's used to these symptoms that make an appearance every year. "I never know when it's going to hit me," said Balbenda. "Around this time, I'm like I can't, I really can't." Allergies can mimic other illness and have signs you may know of. They can show up in ways you least expect, like a toothache. "Nine times out ...
  • Thursday, May 30, 2019 01:26 PM
    Ariana Grande's Throat Almost Closed After An Allergic Reaction To ...
    What's the connection between produce and tree pollen? Basically, your body mistakes proteins found in certain produce for allergens found in trees and plants, per the AAAAI[1]. When you eat these foods, your body triggers an allergic response to fight what it thinks are dangerous foreign substances. This leads to some uncomfortable symptoms, such as an itchy or swollen mouth, face, lip, tongue, or throat, according to the AAAAI[2]. In rare cases, OAS can cause anaphylaxis[3], which is a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction.References^ AAAAI (www.aaaai.org)^ AAAAI (www.aaaai.org)^ anaphylaxis (www.mayoclinic.org)
  • Wednesday, May 22, 2019 12:41 PM
    Simple ways to avoid misery during allergy season
    Allergy season has arrived and more than 22 million people in the U.S. live in areas with high pollen levels. But as CBS News' Dr. Tara Narula told "CBS This Morning," you don't have to be miserable. She shared some simple ways to help people outsmart and fight seasonal allergies.Tips for minimizing allergy symptomsCheck the pollen count in your area via the National Allergy Bureau[1] website. If the count is high, minimize how much time you spend outdoors.Avoid being outside between the hours of 5 a.m. and 10 a.m. and evenings, which tend to be worse for allergy sufferers.When getting ...
  • Friday, May 17, 2019 04:17 AM
    Experts: Attention to diet can beat back food allergies
    When Ross Winn was a baby, his mom Heather Winn, Oklahoma State University Extension educator, tried endless treatments to help relieve his discomfort caused by food allergies.Today Ross, 16, wins lots of motocross races and is an active high school sophomore. But, it was challenging at first, and without his moms diligence, it could have been a different scenario."We didn't realize our son Ross had food allergies until I switched him to formula and he started showing signs of eczema," Winn said. His second Thanksgiving was a mother's nightmare."He was 13 months old so people naturally were poking random foods ...
  • Thursday, May 09, 2019 11:22 AM
    Nashville Neighborhood Watch: Where to Eat and Drink in Germantown - Sounds Like Nashville
    Ten years ago, visitors to Nashville[1] didn’t really have many reasons to experience Germantown, the gritty neighborhood north of the downtown that was named after the immigrant construction workers who had been imported into the city to construct new government buildings after the city was named the capital of Tennessee in the 19th century. Since then, an influx of new residents, fantastic restaurants and drinking establishments have turned the neighborhood into a desirable place to live and visit. Easily walkable, or accessible by scooter if you’re feeling adventurous, Germantown is now on the radar of foodies everywhere.Here’s your cheat sheet ...
  • Monday, April 29, 2019 11:04 AM
    Tips on how to handle the spring allergy season
    April showers bring May flowers. Those rains can also bring on springtime seasonal allergies. It is estimated that 35 million people in the U.S.[1] suffer from seasonal allergies, also known as hay fever.Why is springtime such a peak season for allergies?With the rain and moisture, there is also an increase in the mold, tree and grass pollens, dust mites, and animal dander. Tree pollens start in late March/early April, then decreases, while grass pollens increase in May/June. Weed pollens (e.g. ragweed) is usually later in the summer and early fall. The allergy season can vary tremendously based on where you ...
  • Wednesday, April 17, 2019 10:39 AM
    5 foods to help reduce spring allergies
    Photo credit: Mimage Photography / Shutterstock.comTired of pollen and other allergens that are keeping you from living your best life this spring? Suffering from allergies in the spring can be a nightmare. Not being able to go outside and enjoy the beautiful weather can make one feel like a hostage. While there are a slew of OTC and prescription medications to reduce flare-ups, there are also a few foods that can naturally help with seasonal allergies.Fish“Omega-3 fatty acids in seafood have natural anti-inflammatory effects that boost the immune system. Eating six ounces of salmon,[1] tuna or mackerel, twice a week, is ...
  • Monday, April 08, 2019 03:37 PM
    Severe Peanut Allergies: Scientists Make Breakthrough in ...
    Scientists have come a step closer to creating a treatment for peanut allergies by studying the antibodies at work when the food sends the immune system into overdrive. Allergic reactions happen when the immune system misreads a food protein as a threat. This makes the body create proteins, known as immunoglobulin E (IgE), to attack the allergen. The release of this antibody can cause the potentially fatal symptoms of an allergic reaction, including itching, breathing problems and hives. According to the Food Allergy Research and Education, a nonprofit organization, peanuts are among the most common triggers, alongside eggs, tree nuts, soy, wheat, fish ...
  • Tuesday, April 02, 2019 02:13 PM
    Under-Tongue Allergy Pills Replace Shots for Many
    TUESDAY, April 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Under-the-tongue allergy[1] pills have quickly caught on as a way to treat hay fever[2] and dust mite allergies[3], a new study finds. Allergy shots[4] have been available for more than 100 years, while sublingual, or under-the-tongue, allergy pills were only approved for use in the United States in 2014. But of 268 U.S. allergists surveyed last year, 73% reported prescribing under-the-tongue allergy tablets, according to allergist and lead author Dr. Anita Sivam, of Memphis, Tenn. "Five years ago, allergy tablets[5] hadn't been approved by the FDA and weren't being prescribed for people with ...
  • Tuesday, April 02, 2019 11:36 AM
    Finding Pollen Allergy Relief: What Pill, Spray or Shot is Right?
    Although many hay fever remedies are sold on pharmacy shelves, not everyone gets relief from over-the-counter products. Some also find their symptoms unpredictable – they’re not bad one year, but a mess the next. This is when it’s time to visit an allergist.Consulting a specialist to review your symptom history and for allergy testing will help to identify what’s setting off reactions. That will make it easier to understand triggers and to prevent symptoms, possibly by ramping up medications in advance of spring or fall pollen season.Other culprits, such as dust mites, cat or dog dander or tobacco smoke, could also be ...
  • Monday, March 25, 2019 02:34 PM
    Why do eyes water continually? - tophealthjournal.com
    Tears serve various crucial roles in our body. They are an important component of the immune system and protect us against infection.Generally, our bodies produce tears to keep eyes lubricated and to help remove foreign bodies and dust. But when the tear drainage is affected or the body produces too many tears, the result is extremely watery eyes. Though not certainly harmful, watery eyes can be bothersome and irritating. But, they can generally be treated rapidly and effectively.Watering eyes are a common problem which can occur at any age, largely affecting older people and young babies. Generally, it can occur ...
  • Monday, March 25, 2019 02:29 PM
    Allergies On The Rise Because Of High Pollen Counts
    Spring season is also the start of the pollen season. High counts of pollen were recorded, resulting in allergy symptoms of sneezing, itchy eyes and runny nose.   ( Wikimedia Commons ) The onset of spring also means another thing — it's the start of pollen season that causes irritating allergy to many[1].The pollen season is the time of the year wherein allergy sufferers start showing the symptoms of pollen allergy — sniffling, constant sneezing, runny nose, itchy and watery eyes, and itchy throat. It can also cause headaches, runny nose, fatigue, irritability, and hives.Over 67 million Americans suffer symptoms and ...
  • Wednesday, March 13, 2019 01:32 PM
    Man gets deadly infection in skull after cleaning ears with cotton swab
    Talk about getting an earful.A British man contracted a “potentially life-threatening” bacterial infection in the lining of his skull after he used a cotton swab to clean his ear.A piece of the cotton got stuck in the 31-year-old man’s ear canal, made its way up his skull and reached the lining of his brain, causing neurological symptoms like seizures. He was taken to the emergency room after he collapsed, reports Live Science[1].Dr. Alexander Charlton, an ear, nose and throat specialist at University Hospital Coventry in England who treated the man, told Live Science that the man’s seizures could be linked ...
  • Wednesday, March 13, 2019 06:46 AM
    Ask the Expert: Cold or allergies? How to tell which you have, and ...
    Raquel Lopez Published 6:00 a.m. ET March 13, 2019 Raquel Lopez (Photo: Photo provided by IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital)Do you have a runny nose, cough or sore throat? Does your pink eye, nasal congestion and uncontrollable sneeze have you questioning your health? Many of these symptoms point toward a common cold, but they are also typical signs of allergies.In fact, cold and allergy symptoms both affect the respiratory system and are so similar that many people confuse one for the other. Although they might have similar side-effects, the way to treat each condition is different. To become healthy again, it ...
  • Wednesday, March 06, 2019 05:43 PM
    Sinus problems tied to higher risk of depression, anxiety
    (Reuters Health) - People who suffer from a common chronic sinus disorder may be more likely than those who don’t to develop depression and anxiety, a Korean study suggests. Researchers focused on chronic rhinosinusitis, which happens when the cavities around the nasal passages are inflamed and swollen for at least 12 weeks. Symptoms can include facial pain and headaches, nasal obstruction and an impaired sense of smell. The condition has long been linked to a lower quality of life and problems with physical, social, emotional and cognitive functioning, researchers note in JAMA Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery. Even though depression ...
  • Wednesday, February 27, 2019 07:35 AM
    Allergy Relief: 24/7/365
    For those who suffer from allergic rhinitis, the year can be filled with itchy eyes, a runny nose, an unshakable cough and an overall sense of blah. Here, we look at what is triggering discomfort in each season, and ways to naturally combat the symptoms that dampen one’s ability to enjoy a lovely spring morning, a laid-back summer afternoon, a brisk fall adventure or a cozy, snowy Sunday on the couch.SpringThe month of March marks the beginning of spring. Still, some days grace us with the warm promises of the impending summer while others remind us of the blistering chill ...
  • Thursday, February 07, 2019 06:43 PM
    Food Allergies on the rise in Alabama
    “In part, it’s something called the Hygiene Hypothesis. It’s basically that we are living such cleaner lives, we aren’t living on the farm rolling in the dirt as much as we used to be, sanitation is improving, without that we are not getting exposed early in life to different things so our immune systems is turning on us a little bit and we are getting more of those allergic tendencies,” says Dr. CaJacob.
  • Thursday, February 07, 2019 03:01 PM
    Best air purifiers to help you stay healthy
    If you keep waking up with a scratchy throat or nose, or find yourself sneezing for no apparent reason, the solution could be an air purifier.[1] This at-home device can be a game-changer in the quality of the air that circulates from your bedroom to your kitchen and beyond. As the name suggests, air purifiers remove airborne particles — think dust, bacteria or pollen — and keep the airflow active, which cuts down on symptoms like itchy eyes or that dry throat. Keeping the air from becoming stale can help those who struggle with allergies[2] or asthma to breathe more ...
  • Friday, January 25, 2019 08:04 AM
    Living with a food allergy is difficult enough without restaurants ...
    Living a life with food allergies can feel like you’re walking through a minefield. It means having to call up restaurants in advance to see if it’s possible to eat there, and then feeling like a nuisance every time you have to grill a stumped waiter about how certain foods are prepared. It means developing a habit of meticulously reading through every single ingredient list, and becoming an expert at studying any allergen guide handed to you. And it means checking, double-checking, and then living with the fear that you haven’t checked enough and that any oversight can, in severe ...
  • Tuesday, January 22, 2019 05:22 PM
    Allergic to Penicillin? You May Not Be
    “We used to say nine out of 10 people who report a penicillin allergy are skin-test negative. Now it looks more like 19 out of 20,” said Dr. David Lang, president-elect of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and chairman of allergy and immunology in the respiratory institute at the Cleveland Clinic.Patients can get mislabeled as allergic to penicillin in a number of different ways. They may experience bad drug reactions like headaches, nausea or diarrhea, which are not true allergic reactions but are misinterpreted. Alternatively, they may develop a symptom like a rash, which is indicative of ...
  • Wednesday, January 02, 2019 12:58 PM
    New York boy dies after smell of cooking fish caused possible allergic reaction: report
    The smell of cooking fish could have caused the boy to reportedly have an allergic reaction. (iStock)An 11-year-old boy in Brooklyn, New York, has reportedly died after the smell of cooked fish potentially caused him to have a fatal allergic reaction, according to a report.Cameron Jean-Paul reportedly suffered an allergic reaction Tuesday night when his family was cooking fish, police told the Daily News[1]. At one point, he lost consciousness and was subsequently taken to Brookdale University Hospital Medical Center.CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP[2]The boy died shortly after, the Daily News reported, adding the city medical examiner will determine ...
  • Tuesday, November 27, 2018 02:39 PM
    Are You Blowing Your Nose All Wrong? Here's How to Do It Properly.
    Getty ImagesJose Luis Pelaez Inc Your latest bout with the cold has you tethered to an entire box of tissues. You know the drill. Blow. Toss. Repeat. No matter how often you unclog your drain, though, that mucus just keeps on coming. Sometimes it seems like there’s no end in sight. It’s a familiar scenario and typically a harmless one, too, but some unexpected dangers are lurking in all that snot. It turns out that blowing too hard can actually cause some real damage. So what’s the worst that could happen? Advertisement - Continue Reading Below Aggressive Blowers BewareWhile incredibly ...
  • Tuesday, November 27, 2018 10:58 AM
    Can a cold trigger asthma?
    For most people, the common cold is a minor annoyance. But if you have asthma, a cold can trigger an asthma attack. Colds can be especially serious in children with asthma. Preventing colds and other infections, such as the flu, is one way you can stay healthy and minimize the risk of asthma attacks in you or your child. Colds and Asthma When you have a cold, your runny, stuffy nose and cough can make it harder to breathe. For some individuals, persistent coughing is sufficient to trigger an asthma attack. Not only do colds increase your risk of having an ...
  • Tuesday, November 27, 2018 03:59 AM
    Doctors: Not Just Respiratory System, Air Pollution May Also Severely Affect Eyes - Doctor NDTV
    Problems arising out of air pollution, the indicators can range from minimal or no symptoms to chronic discomfort and irritation such as itching, stinging, the sensation of a foreign body, irritating conjunctivitis and worsening of allergic symptoms. It has been observed that pollution also causes blurring in the eyes and leads to vision trouble. HIGHLIGHTSDoctors say poor air quality can cause several problems for the eyes Damage in the cornea happens due to exposure to pollution Wash the eyes with normal water once in a day If you think it is just the lungs or the respiratory system which get ...
  • Tuesday, November 13, 2018 02:10 AM
    5 things to know about strep throat - KPCnews.com
    You wake up one morning with a scratchy throat, feeling anything but rested. It is an all-too-common scenario that can be annoying for a person who has fallen ill, but it can be difficult to determine whether to visit a doctor. Is it just the common cold, or could it be something more serious — something like strep throat?Most sore throats among adults and children are due to viral infections that just have to run their course. However, these sore throats could be due to strep throat, which needs to be treated with antibiotics.It is important to know when you ...
  • Monday, November 12, 2018 01:43 PM
    Why so many Americans are allergic to peanuts
    Following is the transcript of the video. The US has an epidemic on its hands. Peanut allergies. Between 1997 and 2008, the number of American children with a peanut allergy has tripled. And today, an estimated 1.8 million kids in the US have one. That's larger than the entire population of Philadelphia. And the US is not alone. The UK, Canada, and Australia have seen a similar rise in child peanut allergies. But, that's not the case for other countries like China, Thailand, Korea, the Philippines, and Israel. So, what do these countries have that the US doesn't? In Israel, ...
  • Monday, November 05, 2018 08:12 AM
    MU researchers study cat genomes to treat human allergies
    COLUMBIA, MO. • University of Missouri researchers say efforts to unlock the genetic makeup of cats will lead to a better understanding of human diseases and help identify new treatment options.Cats and humans share many common diseases such as allergies, asthma, obesity and diabetes, says Leslie Lyons[1], a professor of comparative medicine at the MU College of Veterinary Medicine.Since 2013, Lyons has led the 99 Lives Cat Genome Sequencing Initiative[2], which has been building a database of cat genomes from veterinarians, researchers and cat owners who are curious about their cats’ diseases. Lyons studies the polycystic kidney disease, which causes ...
  • Friday, October 19, 2018 02:23 PM
    Allergen-specific immunotherapy can make everyday life much more pleasant for allergy sufferers and provide long-term protection against asthma. It is unclear, however, what exactly happens during this treatment. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München investigated the processes taking place in the body over the course of a three-year allergen-specific immunotherapy. The researchers found clues as to why the allergy immunization takes so long and how the chances of success can be determined at a very early stage.In allergen-specific immunotherapy, once known as hyposensitization, doctors inject patients with the substances that cause allergic reactions, ...
  • Friday, October 19, 2018 11:26 AM
    Ah-hhh choo! Plagued with allergies? New fixes, tips can help
    By Jill U. Adams, Special To The Washington Post If you're like me, you're spending portions of your day rubbing your eyes and blowing your nose. It's fall, which means ragweed is releasing pollen into the air — and people with ragweed allergies are trying to cope.If you're like me, you think that by taking an antihistamine every day, you are doing all you can to keep your symptoms at bay. But otherwise, you muddle through your days, tissues by your side, secretly hoping for a hard frost to kill all those pollen-producing weeds.What else can you do?Plenty, as it ...
  • Friday, October 12, 2018 09:36 AM
    10 Tricky Doctor Names You're Probably Mispronouncing - KXXV News Channel 25
    “I’m going to refer you to an otolaryngologist,” your doctor says casually before typing it into your medical records. The syllables roll off her tongue, and all you can do is blink. An oto-what?Sound familiar? Despite how many Latin-influenced words you use every day (like alibi or impromptu), those doctor titles are on another level. Here’s how to pronounce the most common—and most challenging—doctor names.1. Opthamologist: /off thul MAHL uh jist/An opthamologist is a medical doctor who works with eye function and eye diseases (not to be confused with an optometrist, who is the primary vision care professional). You might ...
  • Friday, October 12, 2018 07:34 AM
    Advancement in Sinusitis Surgery Driving the Growth of Sinusitis Treatment Market, to Grow at a CAGR of 12.4% during ... - Associated Press (press release) (blog)
    NEW YORK, Oct. 12, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Global Sinusitis Treatment Market size is expected to reach, USD 50.41 Billion in 2024, at a CAGR of 12.4% from 2018 to 2024. Factors propelling the growth of the market include growing number of chronic sinusitis patients coupled with technological advancements in sinus surgery. Moreover, growing awareness among people regarding its detection and treatment, and investment in research and development activities by major players is further propelling the growth of the global sinusitis treatment market. The report segments the global sinusitis treatment market by Types (chronic sinusitis, acute sinusitis, sub-acute sinus, and ...
  • Sunday, September 30, 2018 05:20 PM
    Flu season is here - Sand Hills Express
    By  Dr. Jonathan Steinman(NEW YORK) —  It’s the start of fall, which means flu season is here.Last year, flu hospitalizations were the highest they’ve ever been; 106 out of every 100,000 people were hospitalized for the flu in the 2017-18 season, with people over age 65 accounting for 58 percent of those hospitalizations and 180 pediatric deaths.Flu and the common cold can both make you feel crummy, but they are caused by different viruses. Colds are usually milder and do not result in serious health problems associated with the flu, like pneumonia or hospitalizations.Right now, being prepared is the best ...
  • Monday, September 24, 2018 12:56 AM
    Beautiful East Tennessee can be less than ideal for allergy sufferers
    “My ears keep blocking up.”“This drainage just won’t stop.”“My eyes just keep itching and running.”“I’ve got this ticklish cough that just won’t go away.”These are some of the myriad of symptoms experienced by the allergy sufferers of East Tennessee. Further complications to allergy can include asthma flare-ups, sinus infections, ear infections and sleep disturbance to name just a few. And, of course, the situation is made worse by the fact that Knoxville (and its surrounding area) consistently ranks as one of the top cities in the country for allergies.Estimates vary, but up to about 20 percent of the population suffer ...
  • Tuesday, September 04, 2018 06:05 AM
    Flu season is around the corner. Is your family prepared?
    "Everyone over 6 months of age should get their flu vaccine before Halloween," said Atlanta pediatrician Dr. Jennifer Shu, who is a member of the academy but was not involved in the new recommendations. "Don't go trick-or-treating unless you've had your flu shot." Many pediatricians will be offering their patients both the standard flu shot and FluMist nasal spray. The flu shot [1]contains dead influenza virus strains, while the nasal spray contains weakened viruses. The flu shot is the academy's first choice for children 6 months and older because it has provided the most consistent protection against all strains of ...
  • Tuesday, August 28, 2018 09:11 AM
    Fall allergy season already upon us?
    Photo: Wesley Wilson / MGN Copyright by KLFY - All rights reserved Photo: Wesley Wilson / MGN Across the country the fall allergy season might be starting early this year. Kids with pretty bad symptoms of allergies already is been shown Parents who have kids with known allergies should go ahead and start them on a daily over the counter medication. Something like Zyrtec or Claritin is what doctors suggest. Drs. also still seeing a lot of pink eye which is very contagious. It's really important for kids with this to always wash their hands, and parents should remind them not to touch their eyes.Doctors are ...
  • Saturday, August 18, 2018 09:04 AM
    If you're reading this, chances are you've had some trouble with your tonsils.Thousands of people get these small organs every year because of recurring infection and sore throats. And, fortunately, the truth is that unless you are a baby, you don’t really need them.Here, Simon Carney, Professor of Otolaryngology at Flinders University, Adelaide[1], explains their important - but not essential - function to a inquisitive 10-year-old called Ryan, who emailed his question in for a piece on The Conversation[2]. First, Prof Carney explains what our tonsils actually are... Hard to swallow: If tonsils keep getting infected, they may be more trouble than ...
  • Thursday, August 16, 2018 06:15 PM
    FDA Approves 1st Generic EpiPen
    By HealthDay staff HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Aug. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The first generic version of the EpiPen[1] was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday, paving the way for more affordable versions of the lifesaving allergy[2] emergency medication[3]. Though other injectors are available, this drug, made by Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, is the first the FDA has said is the equivalent of the EpiPen. It can be automatically substituted for EpiPen in pharmacies across the United States, the Washington Post reported. With a new school season about to start, people have been reporting a shortage of ...
  • Friday, August 03, 2018 12:45 AM
    Health Tip: Ear Tubes May Help Prevent Ear Infections
    (HealthDay News) -- By the age of 5, the majority of young children will have an ear infection[1], the American Academy of Otolaryngology says.Most ear infections[2] will resolve without medical intervention or with a dose of antibiotics. But in some children, ear infections[3] become chronic.In these cases, parents may wish to discuss with a doctor the appropriateness of using ear tubes[4].Ear tubes are tiny cylinders that allow air to move into the middle ear. They are also referred to as tympanostomy tubes, myringotomy tubes, ventilation tubes or PE (pressure equalization) tubes.Short-term tubes are smaller and typically stay in place for ...
  • Tuesday, July 24, 2018 09:00 AM
    What the Mystery of the Tick-Borne Meat Allergy Could Reveal
    Another unusual aspect of meat allergy is that it can emerge after a lifetime spent eating meat without problems. In other food allergies, scientists think that children’s immune systems may never learn to tolerate the food in the first place. But in meat allergy, the tick seems to break an already established tolerance, causing the immune system to attack what it previously ignored. One way to understand how the parasite pulls this off is to consider its bite as a kind of inadvertent vaccine. A vaccine teaches an immune system to pursue a pathogen it otherwise wouldn’t by exposing it ...
  • Thursday, July 19, 2018 03:00 AM
    Food Allergies Less Severe in Infants: Study
    TUESDAY, July 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A severe allergic reaction[1] to food is much less serious in infants than in toddlers and older children, a new study concludes."We found that infants, unlike older children, have a low-severity food-induced anaphylaxis[2], which should come as reassuring news to parents who are about to introduce their baby to potentially allergenic foods like peanuts," said study author Dr. Waheeda Samady, from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago.Anaphylaxis is a whole-body allergic reaction[3] that can include heart or respiratory problems. In older children, food-triggered anaphylaxis can be life-threatening, but in infants ...
  • Monday, July 16, 2018 03:59 PM
    Can Dogs Keep Kids from Getting Allergies?
    Microbiome: “Exposure to household furry pets influences the gut microbiota of infants at 3-4 months following various birth scenarios.” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: “Maternal farm exposure modulates neonatal immune mechanisms through regulatory T cells.” Se Jin Song, postdoctoral research fellow, University of San Diego Knight Lab. John DiBaise, MD, professor of medicine, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: “Exposure to Pet and Pest Allergens During Infancy Linked to Reduced Asthma Risk.” Kim Kelly, postdoctoral fellow, Human-Animal Interaction Research Initiative, University of Arizona. James E. Gern, MD, principal investigator, University of Wisconsin Asthma and ...
  • Thursday, July 12, 2018 06:38 AM
    Your Good Health: Probiotics have wide range of benefits
    Dear Dr. Roach: With the current focus on gut health, I have been hearing a lot about probiotic supplements. Who should take them? Does the number of bacteria matter more than the types listed on the container? Does one take them daily, for a brief time period, or for extended time periods? K.V.S. Probiotics are healthy bacteria in the large intestines that aid in digestion and possibly other functions in the body. Scientists are just beginning to understand how the intestinal bacteria (called the microbiome) affect many areas of health. There are a few indications for probiotics that are well-accepted. ...
  • Monday, July 02, 2018 12:38 PM
    People with allergies often leave life-saving epinephrine at home
    (Reuters Health) - Most people with severe allergies have filled their prescriptions for epinephrine auto-injectors, but fewer than half carry the devices with them, a new study suggests. About 40 percent of study participants reported having a severe allergic reaction when their auto-injector was unavailable. “Many patients at-risk of potentially life-threatening anaphylaxis do not routinely carry their prescribed epinephrine auto-injectors, despite having experienced severe reactions in the past,” coauthors Christopher Warren and Dr. Ruchi Gupta told Reuters Health in a joint email. Anaphylaxis can occur within seconds or minutes of exposure to something a person is allergic to, such as ...
  • Saturday, June 23, 2018 03:00 AM
    Title: Many With Severe Allergies Don't Carry an EpiPen: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 6/21/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 6/22/2018 12:00:00 AM
  • Wednesday, June 13, 2018 07:56 AM
    "Damn these allergies. Damn them." The post An Account of Personal Suffering appeared first on Nooga.com.
  • Tuesday, June 12, 2018 03:00 AM
    Title: Allergies More Common in Kids With AutismCategory: Health NewsCreated: 6/8/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 6/11/2018 12:00:00 AM
  • Saturday, May 26, 2018 03:00 AM
    FRIDAY, May 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Lots of things grow in the spring, including your risk of severe allergic[1] reactions and asthma[2] attacks. So people need to take preventive measures and know when to seek medical care, an emergency physician says."Spring tends to bring more people to the emergency department," Dr. Paul Kivela, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians, said in a college news release."Conditions like asthma[3] and allergies[4] are manageable for most people but they can easily become life-threatening. Minimize your risk by limiting your exposure to known triggers, carrying your medicines with you if needed, ...
  • Thursday, May 10, 2018 10:23 PM
    Dawn Crisostomo’s 10-year-old son has life-threatening allergies to peanuts, and she usually purchases three boxes of EpiPens each year: one for home, one for school and one that he can carry with him. The EpiPens are sold in sets of two, in case one isn’t enough to open the airways during an acute allergic reaction.But when Ms. Crisostomo went to refill her son’s prescription two weeks ago, her pharmacist said there was a nationwide shortage, then tore open a boxed set and offered her a single EpiPen.“He said, ‘I’m sorry, we literally only have five in stock right now, we ...
  • Monday, May 07, 2018 04:29 PM
    A Nebraska woman’s complaints about a runny nose reportedly turned into a health nightmare. Kendra Jackson said she was given countless explanations for her runny nose — from allergies to winter congestion — before she was diagnosed with a brain fluid leak at Nebraska Medicine, news station KETV reported. The symptoms reportedly began following a...
  • Friday, April 27, 2018 03:48 PM
    If you’ve ever bought into a trendy health fad—a diet, a supplement, a specific type of exercise equipment, an alternative treatment for this or that—then you’ve likely been duped by the $3.7 trillion wellness industry[1] into thinking their products are based on data-driven scientific research. Don’t feel bad. If I were to poll people in Los Angeles, where I live and work, I’d no doubt find plenty of smart, well-educated people who’ve ventured down unconventional paths to wellbeing that have left their wallets lighter. Illness has become passé. What’s in and what sells is wellness, and this market—which includes everything ...
  • Tuesday, April 24, 2018 03:00 AM
    FRIDAY, April 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Nasal mucus could provide important clues about chronic sinusitis[1], researchers say.Chronic sinusitis[2], a common condition, occurs when the sinuses are swollen for more than three months. Analyzing mucus from the nose of someone with chronic sinusitis could help doctors determine whether surgery or medication is the best treatment for that patient, according to the researchers.In this study, researchers from Vanderbilt University in Nashville collected and analyzed nasal mucus from patients with chronic sinusitis. The mucus was analyzed for cytokines, which are proteins that enable cells to talk to each other. Based on the ...
  • Tuesday, April 24, 2018 03:00 AM
    SATURDAY, April 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you have asthma[1], it may help to reduce your exposure to allergens.Previous research has shown that roughly two-thirds of all people with asthma[2] also have an allergy[3], allergy[4] experts say."What many people don't realize is that the same things that trigger your seasonal hay fever[5] symptoms -- things like pollen[6], dust mites, mold[7] and pet dander -- can also cause asthma symptoms[8]," said Dr. Bradley Chipps, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)."If you have allergies[9], and you are wheezing[10] or coughing[11], see an allergist to find out ...
  • Monday, April 09, 2018 12:26 PM
    Regardless of cost or controversy, “What we don’t want anyone to do is say, because the cost is going up, maybe be less vigilant,” Dr. Haywood said. “Because we’re seeing a doubling of the incidence, it’s even more important you’re vigilant on this particular issue.”Guidelines for parents[1] were published in March in JAMA. It’s possible that the increased incidence of emergency room visits may in part be good news; parents may be watching more closely, noting early signs of possible anaphylaxis, using their EpiPens (anyone who uses one needs to be seen immediately in an emergency room, in case the ...
  • Monday, April 02, 2018 09:19 PM
    Photo Babies given antibiotics or antacids in infancy may be at increased risk for allergies in childhood.Researchers retrospectively studied 792,130 infants covered by a health insurance program. Of these, 131,708 received antibiotics, 60,209 got histamine-2 receptor antagonists and 13,687 were given proton pump inhibitors. Both H2 blockers and P.P.I.s are prescribed for gastroesophageal reflex, or GERD.The study, in JAMA Pediatrics[1], followed the children for an average of four and a half years. It found that infants given H2 blockers or P.P.I.s were more than twice as likely to have a food allergy as those who were not; the risk was ...
  • Tuesday, March 27, 2018 03:00 AM
    FRIDAY, March 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Though doctors recommend an early introduction to peanuts, many new moms prefer to delay giving them to their babies[1], researchers report.Allergy[2] experts now say that infants should be exposed to the allergen[3] by the time they are 4 to 6 months old."Food allergies[4] are scary, so it's understandable that parents would hesitate to introduce a food they might see as dangerous," said study co-author Dr. Edmond Chan. He is director of the allergy clinic at BC Children's Hospital at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. "Parents should consult with their pediatrician ...
  • Tuesday, March 27, 2018 12:45 AM
    Dr. Greg May, Family Medicine at UT Erlanger Primary Care - Lookout Mountain Dr. Greg May, Family Medicine at UT Erlanger... Photo by Contributed Photo /Times Free Press. Q: Members of my family are chronic allergy sufferers, but sometimes it is hard to tell when it has become a sinus infection or something more. When is it more than just allergies? A: This is a very common question that we get in our clinic daily. Many illnesses, whether they are allergy mediated or caused by an infection, exhibit similar symptoms. However, the time course and severity of symptoms can differ. ...
  • Tuesday, March 20, 2018 03:00 AM
    SATURDAY, March 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- With spring allergy[1] season just around the corner, it's time to start thinking about how to deal with your symptoms, experts say."Bottom line, very few people suffer from the same allergies[2] or symptoms," Dr. Bradley Chipps, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), said in a news release from the organization."You have to create a personal treatment plan by first avoiding the things you're allergic[3] to, and then treating your specific symptoms," he said. "The question for many people is whether over-the-counter[4] remedies are enough, or if prescription medications ...
  • Friday, March 09, 2018 01:49 AM
    Taking hay fever pills may put men at higher risk of infertility, a study claims.The antihistamine tablets, which cost around $10 each, treat symptoms of mild allergies such as hay fever.They control levels of histamine, a molecule produced by the immune system when facing a threat.Scientists in Argentina, who mostly tested animals, concluded hay fever tablets are likely to affect the production of hormones in the testicles.This can hit sex drive, lead to lower-quality sperm — and less. About one in six UK couples struggle to conceive.Up to a third of Brits suffer from hay fever.Antihistamines are also taken for ...
  • Monday, March 05, 2018 07:07 AM
    Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.SUBSCRIBEGiant doses of steroids don’t help kids control asthma flareups and might stunt their growth, researchers reported Saturday.And they barely help adults, either, according to a pair of reports published in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at an allergy meeting.It’s a common practice but one that providers might want to reconsider, said Dr. Elizabeth Matsui, a professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University.“The practice of increasing the dose of inhaled glucocorticoids in children is generally not endorsed in guidelines. But if you ...
  • Tuesday, February 27, 2018 02:00 AM
    SATURDAY, Feb. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Your children may already be looking forward to summer camp. But when it comes to kids with asthma[1] or allergies[2], parents need to take extra steps in planning their outdoor experience."Kids with allergies[3] and asthma[4] need an extra layer of preparation to ensure they stay healthy and enjoy their adventure," said Dr. Bradley Chipps, president of the American College of Allergy[5], Asthma[6] and Immunology."Parents have to make sure they have packed the right medications and that there's been communication with the camp in advance to keep their child's symptoms under control," he explained ...
  • Tuesday, February 20, 2018 12:46 PM
    The first treatment to help prevent serious allergic reactions to peanuts may be on the way. A company said Tuesday that its daily capsules of peanut flour helped children tolerate nuts in a major study. Millions of children have peanut allergies, and some may have life-threatening reactions if accidentally exposed to them. Doctors have been testing daily doses of peanut flour, contained in a capsule and sprinkled over food, as a way to prevent that. California-based Aimmune (AIM-yoon) Therapeutics said 67 percent of kids who had its treatment were able to tolerate the equivalent of roughly two peanuts at the ...
  • Monday, February 12, 2018 01:15 PM
    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients are more likely than others to get antibiotics[1] they don't need, new research shows. White adults and children, along with those who had private insurance[2] and lived in urban areas, were more likely to receive a prescription for an antibiotic for common conditions caused by viruses, the researchers said. Antibiotics only work against bacterial infections[3], not viruses. "Understanding the factors that impact prescribing is critical to determining how to reduce the misuse of antibiotics," said researcher Melanie Spencer. She's executive director of Carolinas HealthCare System's Center ...
  • Monday, February 05, 2018 11:00 AM
    A disruption in one or more of these functions can lead to serious, sometimes lifelong, health problems. If, for example, gut maturation is impaired or delayed, some experts believe undigested proteins could leak into the bloodstream and trigger an allergy or gluten intolerance, or an impaired immune system could result in an autoimmune disorder like Type 1 diabetes, juvenile arthritis or multiple sclerosis.Babies are exposed to some organisms in utero, but the organisms encountered during birth and the first months of life have the greatest influence on those that become permanent residents in their guts. Recent studies have shown that ...
  • Tuesday, January 30, 2018 10:26 AM
    Nancy De Gennaro, USA TODAY NETWORK – Tennessee Published 8:00 a.m. CT Jan. 30, 2018 | Updated 11:11 a.m. CT Jan. 30, 2018 New guidelines recommend introducing all children to peanut-containing foods within their first six months. Buzz60For her Girl Scout Gold Award project, Central Magnet junior Molly Gilliland is lobbying for better food service education regarding food allergies.(Photo: Nancy DeGennaro/DNJ)Buy PhotoJust 12 words added to the Tennessee Food Code could make dining out safer for those with food allergies. And a Murfreesboro teenager is lobbying to make that happen.As part of her Girl Scout Gold Award project, Central Magnet ...
  • Tuesday, January 23, 2018 12:45 AM
    Dr. Curt Chaffin, MD; member, Chattanooga-Hamilton County Medical Society Dr. Curt Chaffin, MD; member, Chattanooga-Hamilton County Medical... Photo by Contributed Photo /Times Free Press. Q: My medical chart says I have a "penicillin allergy." Am I really allergic? A: Up to 10 percent of the U.S. population thinks they are allergic to penicillin, but recent studies show that less than 10 percent truly are. With the increased use of electronic medical records, drug allergies are a part of your medical record likely to be shared with all physicians and hospitals. Once you've been labeled "penicillin allergic," you won't receive penicillin ...
  • Monday, January 15, 2018 09:22 PM
    LONDON (AP) — Tempted to stifle a loud or untimely sneeze? Let it out instead, doctors in England warned Monday based on the very unusual case of a man who ruptured the back of his throat when he tried to suppress a sneeze.In a case study published in the journal BMJ Case Reports, doctors described their initial confusion when the previously healthy man turned up in the emergency room of a Leicester hospital, complaining of swallowing difficulties and “a popping sensation” in his swollen neck.The 34-year-old patient told them his problems started after he tried to stop a forceful sneeze ...
  • Monday, January 08, 2018 12:45 AM
    If you go › What: Outdoor Chattanooga's Winter Workshops › When: 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays Jan. 18 - March 1 › Where: Outdoor Chattanooga in Coolidge Park, 200 River St. Maybe you wouldn't expect to become dehydrated going for a run or completing a fitness routine outside in the winter. It's too cold. You're not sweating. You'd be wrong. Moisture loss isn't as noticeable in the winter because people don't sweat nearly as much as they would during the summer months. But breathing dry winter air increases moisture loss through exhaling water vapor. So performing even normal, everyday ...
  • Wednesday, January 03, 2018 02:00 AM
    TUESDAY, Jan. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As one year ends and another begins, people often assess their habits and lifestyle, and consider changes that could improve their health.But what, exactly, should you do?Here are six steps you can take to enhance your well-being, according to doctors from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA):1. Keep a personal health calendar."In our busy lives, we hardly pay attention to our health, and most health issues start with subtle symptoms that we fail to follow," Dr. Aparna Sridhar said in a UCLA news release. She's an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology ...
  • Saturday, December 23, 2017 02:00 AM
    THURSDAY, Dec. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Allergies[1] and asthma[2] can be worse than the Grinch when it comes to ruining your holiday spirit."People may not want to admit their allergies[3] and asthma[4] interfere with their holiday fun, but the truth is, symptoms can occur any time of the year," said Dr. Bradley Chipps, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology."If you keep in mind some simple tips, you can prepare yourself -- and your nose and eyes -- for allergy symptoms[5] that may crop up during the holidays," he said in a news release from the ...
  • Tuesday, December 19, 2017 09:15 AM
    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Dec. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- It's safe for people with an egg allergy[1] to get a flu shot[2], says a leading U.S. allergists' group. Doctors no longer need to question patients about egg allergy[3] before giving the vaccine[4], according to an updated guideline from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. "When someone gets a flu shot[5], health care[6] providers often ask if they are allergic to eggs[7]," said guideline lead author Dr. Matthew Greenhawt. "We want health care providers and people with egg allergy to know there is no need to ...
  • Thursday, December 07, 2017 05:47 PM
    WKRN web staff Published: December 7, 2017, 4:45 pm NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – The Nashville Predators announced Thursday that they will be joining the “Transit for Nashville” Coalition.Predators President and CEO Sean Henry released a statement regarding the decision.We support the mayor’s transit plan because it means our employees, Predators fans and other visitors to Bridgestone Arena will have safer, cheaper and more reliable ways to get in and out of downtown. We need a system that allows people to move around our city in more ways than just cars, and transit will keep downtown moving for tourists and locals ...
  • Saturday, December 02, 2017 10:00 AM
      News 2 is streaming the parade live. Watch above or click here from the News 2 app. [1]NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – The 64th Nashville Christmas Parade got underway at 8:30 a.m. Saturday after a morning filled with last minute rehearsals and preparations.News 2 Good Morning Nashville anchors Neil Orne, Nikki Burdine and Jared Plushnick are all on hand for the live broadcast at 9:00 a.m.Watch the parade now on News 2. If you’re not near a TV, you can watch it here on WKRN.com and on Facebook Live at https://www.facebook.com/wkrntv/.Professional dancers have polished their routines and crews have been working hard to finish ...
  • Monday, November 27, 2017 08:36 AM
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – News 2 is proud to be the home of the 64th Annual Nashville Christmas Parade this Saturday.Good Morning Nashville anchors Neil Orne and Nikki Burdine along with meteorologist Jared Plushnick will host the parade live from downtown Nashville.When the parade begins at 9 a.m., it will follow a new route through Music City.This year it will start on top of the Woodland Street Bridge, head down First Street and go up Broadway.The new path is designed to make it a better viewing experience for the public, says Stephen Francescon, Community Relations Manager at Piedmont Natural Gas, which ...
  • Thursday, November 09, 2017 02:00 AM
    By Amy NortonHealthDay ReporterWEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you're looking for a cough[1] remedy this cold[2] season, you might be out of luck.Nothing has been proven to work that well, according to a new report from the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP).After reviewing clinical trials[3] testing everything from cough syrups[4] to zinc, an ACCP panel came to some less-than-positive conclusions: Over-the-counter medicines -- including cold and cough[5] products and anti-inflammatory painkillers -- cannot be recommended.Nor is there evidence supporting most home remedies -- though, the group says, honey is worth a shot for kids.Every season, most ...
  • Thursday, November 02, 2017 09:03 AM
    One honeybee's stinger wound up in a pretty weird location: lodged in the back of a teen girl's throat, a recent report of the case reveals. The 13-year-old was hanging out by a pool when an insect unexpectedly flew into her mouth. The girl started coughing immediately, and over the next few hours, she started to feel pain in her throat and right ear, and had difficulty swallowing, according to the case report.  Concerned about these symptoms, her parents took the girl to an ear, nose and throat specialist, where doctors used a device called a laryngoscope to examine the ...
  • Tuesday, October 31, 2017 03:00 AM
    FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Is the roof of your mouth itchy[1] after a peanut butter sandwich? Does your skin break out in hives[2] after you've cracked your way through a lobster dinner?It's possible you're one of the many adults who developed a food allergy[3] as an adult, a new study says.Researchers surveyed adults with food allergies[4] and found that nearly half said that one or more of their allergies[5] began in adulthood."Food allergies are often seen as a condition that begins in childhood, so the idea that 45 percent of adults with food allergies develop them in ...
  • Thursday, October 26, 2017 02:34 PM
    If you have allergies or asthma, or are sensitive to pollution, you may have considered purchasing an air purifier to clean the air inside your home. Now, with smoke from destructive wildfires still burning in Northern California affecting people as far as 100 miles away, even those without specific health concerns are thinking about ways to improve indoor air quality. But with so many types of filtration systems on the market (and prices ranging from $100 to nearly $1,000), it can be hard to know where to begin. Check out this quick guide[1] to home air purifiers to figure out ...
  • Tuesday, October 17, 2017 03:00 AM
    SATURDAY, Oct. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Halloween's frights extend beyond goblins and ghouls if you're a child with food allergies[1] or asthma[2]."You want Halloween to be scary for the right reasons -- ghosts, goblins and witches -- not allergies[3] and asthma[4]," said allergist Dr. Stephen Tilles, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. "If you follow a few common-sense rules, you should be able to keep your kids safe and the party going without allergy[5] and asthma symptoms[6]," he said in an association news release. Here, Tilles offers parents tips on how to limit the risk ...
  • Saturday, October 07, 2017 03:00 AM
    (HealthDay News) --Your child's sinuses are not fully developed until late in the teen years, but the child can still develop a sinus infection[1].Although small, the maxillary (behind the cheek) and ethmoid (between the eyes) sinuses are present at birth.Childhood sinus problems may be difficult to diagnose, because symptoms may be caused by other problems, such as a viral illness or allergy[2].According to the American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, these symptoms may indicate a sinus infection:Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. Subscribe to MedicineNet's Allergy and Asthma Newsletter By clicking Submit, I agree to the ...
  • Thursday, September 21, 2017 03:00 AM
    TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who develop respiratory infections like colds or sinusitis[1] may have a higher risk of asthma[2] and reduced lung function later in life, a new study says.Researchers examined data from nearly 155,000 children in Europe. They were followed from birth through ages 4 to 15 years.Those who had an upper respiratory infection[3] -- such as a cold[4], sinusitis[5], laryngitis[6] and tonsillitis[7] -- by age 5 had an increased risk of asthma[8] later in life. Their risk was 1.5 times higher. Young children who had lower respiratory tract infections such as bronchitis[9], bronchiolitis, pneumonia[10] ...
  • Tuesday, September 19, 2017 03:11 PM
    Overview | How does the immune system react to allergens, causing allergy symptoms in some people? How can children, parents, doctors and communities respond to allergies, both mild to severe? In this lesson, students conduct a one-question interview to gather data on how much their classmates know about and are affected by allergies. Then, they work in groups to create a play to teach one another, and others in the school community, about allergies, including how the immune system works in people with and without allergies. Materials | Computers with Internet access, materials for props and costumes, research materials on ...
  • Saturday, September 09, 2017 03:00 AM
    (HealthDay News) -- A sinus infection[1] may be caused by bacteria, viruses[2] or even fungi. Treatment depends on the type of infection, so you should see your doctor for a diagnosis and treatment options.Here are common symptoms of a sinus infection, courtesy of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Copyright © 2007 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved. Subscribe to MedicineNet's Allergy and Asthma Newsletter By clicking Submit, I agree to the MedicineNet's Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy[3] and understand that I may opt out of MedicineNet's subscriptions at any time. References^ sinus infection (www.medicinenet.com)^ viruses (www.medicinenet.com)^ ...
  • Monday, August 21, 2017 04:22 PM
    Probiotics could be the key to curing children of peanut allergies, and might also point the way to breakthroughs on treating any food allergy at all. New research published recently in the Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal finds that a course of probiotics and peanut oral immunotherapy helped children kick their peanut allergies and remain desensitized to peanuts for at least four years.  These study results suggest the addition of probiotics to treatment could lead to higher rates of success than if children underwent oral immunotherapy on its own[1]. A randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of oral immunotherapy and oral ...
  • Wednesday, August 09, 2017 10:00 AM
    “Mild allergic reactions can be frustrating, disruptive and distracting. Mindfulness practices offer a safe and effective way for people experiencing allergies to become present in the moment, and more accepting of their reality.” – Rachael Kable[1], an Australian mindfulness mentor and host of The Mindful Kind podcast.If you are suffering from hay fever or seasonal allergies, notice your symptoms in a nonjudgmental way. If your eyes are itching or your nose is running, try to acknowledge that without labeling the experience “good” or “bad.”Set the intention to take good care of yourself with compassion, patience and understanding. It may also ...
  • Friday, August 04, 2017 09:00 AM
    It has been well established that kids develop allergies to the “top eight” foods: milk, egg, wheat, soy, peanut, tree nuts, fish and shellfish. Most of the reactions in adults occur to the top eight foods as well, according to Dr. Sharon Chinthrajah, an assistant professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine and medical director of the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research, which was involved in shaping the survey. That said, shellfish allergy is more common among adults than among children, as it tends to appear later in life.Several patterns have been observed that are ...
  • Wednesday, July 26, 2017 10:31 AM
    Apple is teaming up with medical device maker Cochlear Limited to develop the first-ever cochlear implant sound processor that allows users to stream sound right from their iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. The Cochlear Nucleus 7 device, which was announced on Wednesday, received FDA approval in June. In recent years, Apple has worked with other medical device makers like GN ReSound to create iOS-compatible hearing aids[1]. There are now more than 50 hearing aids that work with iPhones. For many, there is still a stigma surrounding hearing aids. But the high-tech versions intend to reduce some of that stress because ...
  • Wednesday, June 28, 2017 05:01 AM
    Nashville has all the glitz, minus the glam. Tennessee’s capital is where Taylor Swift goes to write music and escape from the paparazzi, where you can catch country music star Carrie Underwood cheering on her NHL star husband Mike Fisher at a Nashville Predators game, and where you can shop at actress Reese Witherspoon’s charming, sweet tea-serving clothing boutique called Draper James (2608 12th Ave. South). On any given weekend, expect Broadway — a major strip in the city and a country music-focused entertainment district — to be bustling with parades of bachelor and bachelorette parties causing a stir at ...
  • Friday, June 16, 2017 03:00 AM
    WEDNESDAY, June 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When seasonal allergies[1] strike, what remedy is right for you? The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has some answers.An allergy[2] is your body's reaction to a substance it considers an invader. The body reacts to that invader by releasing chemicals called histamines, which cause the sneezing[3], wheezing[4] and itchy[5], watery eyes[6] that make life miserable, the FDA explains.Antihistamines[7] are available in many forms, including tablets and liquids. Many oral antihistamines are available over-the-counter (OTC) and some are available by prescription and in generic form, according to the FDA.When choosing an OTC antihistamine[8], always ...
  • Monday, June 12, 2017 03:40 PM
    Jim and Jess Gehring of Philadelphia talk about their weekend in Nashville for CMA Fest 2017 and Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Finals. Jake Lowary / USA TODAY NETWORK - TennesseeNASHVILLE -- After a weekend that saw Nashville at the center of the entertainment and sports worlds, a record number of global travelers descended upon Nashville International Airport to say goodbye.John Barron, of Townsville, Queensland, Australia, was among those on Monday. He was en route to Las Vegas with his wife Sonia after the couple wrapped up their fourth visit to Nashville's CMA Music Festival.Their trip to Nashville was part of ...
  • Tuesday, June 06, 2017 03:00 AM
    FRIDAY, June 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The changeable weather that many areas of the United States experiences may lead to a pollen[1] "superburst" -- and for allergy[2] sufferers that may mean misery, a sinus specialist cautions."It promises to be a nasty spring," Dr. Jordan Josephson, from Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said in a hospital news release. Usually, pollens come in waves. First, trees, then weeds, then grasses. But this year, they may all hit around the same time, he said.About 60 million Americans suffer from pollen allergies[3]. Symptoms can include nasal stuffiness and discharge, headaches[4], cough[5], ...
  • Tuesday, May 23, 2017 09:09 AM
    It could have been the longest countdown in the history of sports.Forget the traditional 10-9-8 and so on. When Austin Watson and Colton Sissons staked the Nashville Predators to an early two-goal lead Monday in Game 6 of the Western Conference final it seemed as if all that remained was for the clock to run down to 0:00.The mood inside Bridgestone Arena was such that had anyone thought to figure it out, the sellout crowd might actually have started at 3,073 and worked down from there.Of course, it was not that easy. Nothing worthwhile ever is. The Anaheim Ducks pulled ...
  • Tuesday, May 02, 2017 06:24 PM
    The Nashville Predators Foundation, the charitable arm of the hockey team, is set Wednesday for its largest grant distribution.        
  • Wednesday, April 12, 2017 10:47 AM
    Andrei Javier, M.D., For 12th & Broad Published 6:05 a.m. CT March 16, 2017 | Updated 14 minutes ago An allergy specialist breaks down which foods help you control your allergies and the ones that can make your allergies worse. VPC FOOD FOR ALLERGY RELIEFYou don't have to suffer from allergies in silence. Get some help and maybe some honey.(Photo: Pixabay.com)The sun is coming out and the days are longer, which means spring is in the air and the flowers are blooming. Sadly, blooming flowers also means pollen. For many living in Middle Tennessee, seasonal allergies can wreak havoc on ...
  • Wednesday, April 05, 2017 11:12 AM
    Jimmy Settle , USA TODAY NETWORK – Tennessee Published 6:32 a.m. CT March 31, 2017 | Updated 54 minutes ago On August 21, 2017 at 1:25 p.m., Clarksville will witness the latest solar eclipse to cross the entire continental U.S. in 99 years. Anyssa Roberts | USA TODAY NETWORK - TennesseeThe path of the solar eclipse that will slice across the United States on Aug. 21st is seen on promotional material from American Paper Optics as part of the company's marketing campaign to sell glasses that are used for looking directly at the eclipse.(Photo: Brad Vest/The Commercial Appeal)The total eclipse ...
  • Thursday, March 30, 2017 07:30 AM
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – The real estate boom in Nashville is real and it’s evident just about everywhere you look, but some neighborhoods are hotter than others.You’ve heard the numbers – dozens upon dozens of people moving to Nashville every day.“We are the ‘it’ city and it is sort of the ‘it’ story right now,” said Gloria Houghland, an affiliate broker with the Lipman Group.Houghland has been watching it all develop for some time now.Photo: WKRN“Everyone is talking about it, all of Nashville is hot, hot, hot,” she said.Some areas though are more popular than others. 12South, East Nashville, Germantown ...
  • Monday, March 27, 2017 11:32 AM
    If you have an allergic reaction to one type of nut, you might be tempted to avoid eating all others. After all, symptoms like itchy lips, hives and face swelling aren't pleasant, and food allergies can be life threatening in the worst-case scenarios.But now, a new study[1] finds that just because you're diagnosed with a nut allergy doesn't necessarily mean you're allergic to it. In the research published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, at least half of people with a diagnosed nut allergy do not show allergic symptoms to other types of nuts—even when tests show that they ...
  • Sunday, March 19, 2017 11:42 PM
    Submitted: 03/19/2017 - 11:42pm Tags: Allergy Season, Chattanooga, Chattanooga Allergy Clinic[1][2][3] CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (WDEF) — One local allergist says our pollen season this year is worse than before.Chattanooga Allergy Clinic Co-Owner Dr. Todd Levin says that allergies started mid-February, which is very early for this season.He says patients are suffering from runny nose, congestion and he is dealing with more asthma cases.Levin anticipates within the next few weeks, tree pollen will be a lot worse.“We’ve been much, much busier than normal. Our phone lines are ringing off the hook and patients are even sicker than usual,” Dr. Levin said.Patients are ...
  • Thursday, March 16, 2017 07:10 AM
    Andrei Javier, M.D., For 12th & Broad 6:05 a.m. CT March 16, 2017 You don't have to suffer from allergies in silence. Get some help and maybe some honey.(Photo: Pixabay.com)The sun is coming out and the days are longer, which means spring is in the air and the flowers are blooming. Sadly, blooming flowers also means pollen. For many living in Middle Tennessee, seasonal allergies can wreak havoc on their daily lives. If you are one of these allergy sufferers you are not alone. Over 50 million people in the United States are affected by allergies and Nashville and other ...
  • Tuesday, March 14, 2017 09:15 PM
    Cooked salmon fish fillet with pepper, lemon and herbs(Photo: MariaUspenskaya, Getty Images/iStockphoto)With pollen counts pumping up sooner than expected this year[1], many allergy sufferers will reach for eye drops, allergy shots and other medications for relief. But what about a plate of poached salmon, a kale salad or a crisp red pepper?Allergy-fighting antihistamines come in pill and liquid forms, but they appear naturally vitamin C-packed vegetables. Those, as well as fish rich in Omega-3s, make up an anti-inflammatory diet that can help beat back allergy symptoms, said Emily Telfair, a naturopathic doctor in Baltimore.Think of antihistamine medications "like the bandaid," she said, necessary for ...
  • Tuesday, March 07, 2017 08:00 AM
    During allergy season—or on any pet-filled day of the year—many people rely on medications or allergy shots to provide much-needed relief. But doctors may also recommend alternative remedies or lifestyle tweaks to deal with allergy triggers.“These options aren’t necessarily mainstream medicine, but they're consistent with the evolution toward precision medicine,” says Dr. Steven Tilles, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. “We’re trying to find treatments that work for patients in real life, not just treatments that work for patients on paper.” Here are a few lesser-known strategies that may help with itching, sneezing and other allergy ...
  • Tuesday, February 28, 2017 03:20 AM
    The price of EpiPens has surged in recent years — an increase connected to the device, not the epinephrine, which is a hormone also known as adrenaline and costs pennies for a dose. A package of two EpiPens now costs more than $600[1], up from just over $100 in 2009. In response to public outcry and lawmaker scrutiny, Mylan last December released its own generic version[2] of the device at about half the cost, but that’s still out of reach for many people.Meanwhile, some insurers have dropped coverage of the pricey name-brand auto-injector pack or made sure customers have access ...
  • Wednesday, February 22, 2017 10:26 AM
    Imagine that you are pregnant, unexpectedly. You are terrified, but not because you don’t want a baby. You are in fact, happily married, and you have been intending to start a family soon. Rather, you are terrified because an epidemic of a viral disease is raging around you. It is a disease that is often so mild that people aren’t aware that they have it. But when it infects a woman early in her pregnancy, it devastates the fetus, shrinking its head and addling its brain. There is no effective treatment and there is no vaccine.I am not describing the ...
  • Friday, February 17, 2017 05:30 AM
    Is it a cold, or something else? It’s easy to diagnose yourself with a cold when you’re feeling unwell. But a cold isn’t always just a cold. It’s important to be able to tell the difference between the common cold and something more serious so you can get the medical attention you need. If you think you have "just a cold" but are concerned it could be something more, it’s best to err on the safe side and visit your doctor. This is especially true if you have a chronic condition such as asthma, severe allergies, diabetes, kidney disease, HIV, ...
  • Monday, February 13, 2017 06:31 PM
    Our real estate market is not at the bubble stage getting ready to burst. It’s more likely to gently contract.        
  • Sunday, January 29, 2017 04:39 PM
    Creating an allergy-free peanut is deceptively simple: Roast, shell and peel it, then soak it in an enzymatic solution that removes about 98 percent of the allergens within the peanut.But the patented process, developed by researchers at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, could be life-changing for people with peanut allergies, though some scientists and organizations warn that there’s still a long way to go.The key to the peanut-cleansing treatment is alcalase, an enzyme that breaks down proteins in peanuts. Alcalase is used in some laundry detergents to remove protein-based stains like grass and blood, according to the National ...
  • Monday, January 23, 2017 09:00 AM
    Many people believe that as the spring and fall seasons wrap up, so do their allergies, but that’s not always the case once winter rolls around.“Winter time allergies as opposed to seasonal allergies usually have to do with indoor allergens,” says allergist Dr. Chris Cleveland.While indoor allergies can affect you year-round, Dr. Cleveland, said it’s mainly confined to the winter months.“Really when we switch over our heating and ventilation systems in our homes, that’s when we really start having more troubles with the pet allergens and the dust mite allergens because we’re indoors all the time,” Dr. Cleveland explains.
  • Monday, January 09, 2017 01:14 AM
    Maida P. Galvez, MDAssociate Professor of Environmental Medicine and Public Health Associate Professor of Pediatrics Director of the Region 2 Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty UnitIcahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai[1][2]Why You Should Avoid Antibacterial Soap"Wash your hands!" It's every child's marching orders, and for good reason. Hand-washing [3]is the single most effective way to prevent getting sick and combat the spread of germs. It reduces infections like the common cold that are passed from person to person. We are told to wash with soap and water to prevent the transmission of bacteria, so an antibacterial soap should be the ...
  • Wednesday, December 28, 2016 06:17 PM
    Nashville’s dining scene has been abuzz ever since Austin Ray and Chef Jason Brumm announced they were partnering on an undisclosed project in a yet-to-be-named location. There were few details in the original disclosure[1] other than it was promised to bring a much-needed type of food to a neighborhood that was underserved, but Tennessean food writer Jim Myers breathlessly hinted, “I've been selfishly waiting thirty years for a place like this to open in Nashville. I am giddy with hope and excitement.”High praise, indeed, but if you know Jim, there were some clues in that initial article. In addition to being ...
  • Monday, December 19, 2016 07:31 AM
    The holidays are in full swing and while we can’t help make your New Year’s resolutions, we can assist on ways to celebrate. As 2017 creeps closer and closer, so does the decision on how to ring in the New Year. If you live in Music City or are thinking of making a trip to Nashville before the year comes to an end, here are five music-filled options guaranteed for a memorable New Year’s Eve in Tennessee.1. Headlining set by Keith Urban[1] at Jack Daniel’s Music City Midnight PartyWhat better way to ring in 2017 than with a performance in ...
  • Thursday, December 15, 2016 05:00 AM
    Allergic reactions to peanuts cause around 500 hospitalizations and even some deaths in the United States each year. Food that contains trace amounts, because it was produced with factory equipment or kitchen tools that came into contact with peanuts, can prove fatal for allergic individuals who consume it unsuspectingly. Accidentally ingesting as little as a third of a single peanut — about 70 milligrams — can send someone to the emergency room, and some people may react to only 1 milligram, says Burks, who is now a leading allergy researcher.For a long time, the only way to address peanut allergies ...
  • Tuesday, December 13, 2016 11:00 AM
    In America and around the world, the magical holiday season is widely considered one of the best of times. However, if you get miserably sick, it could also be the worst of times, not only for you, but also for those around you. If you plan to travel to visit relatives, friends or loved ones during the holidays, you’ll obviously want to feel at your best and look your best. Here are a few tips on how to stay healthy during your upcoming holiday travels.
  • Wednesday, December 07, 2016 05:00 AM
    Red eyes can spark a lot of annoying questions from people wondering if you’re sick, upset, or hungover. But bloodshot eyes can be caused by a bunch of different things. They’re often a sign of another problem—like dry eyes, too little sleep, or even overdoing it on certain eye drops, says Andrew Holzman, M.D., ophthalmologist and regional medical director of TLC Laser Eye Centers in Maryland. (For 2,000+ other tips on how to live your best life, check out the Men’s Health Better Man Project[1].) Here are 10 possible culprits, and how you can fix them. #1. CAUSE OF RED EYES: YOUR ...
  • Monday, December 05, 2016 03:09 PM
    Calls or texts from pharmacies before major storms help prompt people to stock up on their medications, according to a new study. People who received a call or text before a major blizzard struck the northeastern United States in January 2016 were 9 percent more likely than those who didn't receive a reminder to refill medications before travel became hazardous, researchers found. "At a time when there is increased risk due to a natural disaster, how do you identify those people most at risk and get them the medications they need to stay at home," said senior author Dr. William ...
  • Sunday, November 27, 2016 07:00 AM
    Thumb sucking, picky eating and nose picking are not only a nuisance, but they can have lasting effects on your child’s health. Here, experts weigh in on why these habits are harmful and offer their best tips for how to deal with your child’s behaviors. 1. Hanging onto the bottleSwitching from a bottle to a sippy cup is often one of the most challenging things for toddlers to do. Plus, drinking too much milk can cause your tot to skip meals and miss out on calcium-rich foods like leafy green vegetables, yogurt and cheese and may even lead to iron ...
  • Wednesday, November 23, 2016 06:27 AM
    Thanksgiving is upon us[1], and with it, one of the busiest travel periods of the year. This week, more than 48 million Americans will journey from their homes to celebrate the holiday, according to the American Automobile Association.But while everyone is eager to get to their destination to celebrate with family and friends, mishaps do happen — and in some instances can turn into emergencies.Dr. Steven Corbett, an emergency medicine physician at Orlando Health, said many travelers often forget that they can still get ill while away. “But people are people whether they’re traveling or otherwise. So we see the ...
  • Tuesday, November 15, 2016 02:00 AM
    FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Most colleges don't have comprehensive programs to support students with food allergies, putting them at risk for life-threatening allergic[1] reactions, according to a new study."Our study found that while many colleges offer support for students with food allergy[2] in the dining hall, the same support doesn't carry over to organized sports, dormitories or social events" said lead author Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University."That leaves students feeling vulnerable and scrambling to inform all the various departments of their needs," she added in a news release from the American ...
  • Friday, November 11, 2016 12:06 PM
    (Reuters Health) – Parents may be able to reduce the chance that their children will develop peanut allergies by introducing the food early on, as young as four to six months of age, experts now say. The timing and method should depend on the infant’s risk of a peanut allergy, according to doctors who presented a preview of updated guidelines today in San Francisco at the annual meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.“Guidance regarding when to introduce peanut into the diet of an infant is changing, based on new research that shows that early introduction around ...
  • Thursday, November 10, 2016 05:41 AM
    What's that cough? Everybody coughs; it's the number one illness-related reason people go to the doctor, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most cases of cough are temporary, says Peter Dicpinigaitis, MD, director of the Montefiore Cough Center and professor of clinical medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. But even a short-term cough can be a sign of a bigger health issue that needs to be addressed by a doctor. Here's how to narrow down the possible culprits—from asthma to pneumonia to whooping cough—so you can get better, fast. A cold virus ...
  • Friday, October 28, 2016 02:15 PM
    Delivering small amounts of peanut protein boosted tolerance for about half of young patients in study WebMD News from HealthDay By Kathleen Doheny HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A skin patch that delivers small amounts of peanut protein may help treat children and young adults with peanut allergy[1], researchers report. The new approach "looks promising and has potential," said study author Dr. Marshall Plaut. He is chief of the food allergy[2], atopic dermatitis[3] and allergic mechanisms section at the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Plaut's research team worked with 74 children and young ...
  • Tuesday, October 25, 2016 03:00 AM
    FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Trick-or-treating, bobbing for apples and costume parties are just a few things kids love about Halloween, but holiday fun can put them at risk, health experts warn.The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers parents these tips to help keep Halloween safe and fun:Beware of sugar overload. Don't trick-or-treat on an empty stomach. Make sure your children have a light meal or healthy snack before heading out. Keep an eye out for candy tampering. Always check kids' candy before letting them eat it. Discard anything that looks discolored or odd, has pinholes ...
  • Saturday, October 15, 2016 02:10 PM
    Sometimes a good sports story is just a well-told tail. That's what Jim Diamond - who covers the Nashville Predators for the Associated Press and Rinkside Report - discovered when he went to their season opener on Friday night.During the second period, he was shooting photos of Roman Josi working the puck up the ice. When he went to look at the photos, he discovered that not only did he have a shot of Josi, he had a good shot of a yellow lab following the game.To make the situation more adorable, the pup was right above the advertisement for ...
  • Sunday, October 02, 2016 07:00 AM
    Flying, stinging insects can be more aggressive in the early fall. Learn your risk for serious reactions.        
  • Monday, September 26, 2016 08:00 AM
    The Food and Drug Administration[1] recently issued a final rule banning the sale[2] of certain over-the-counter antibacterial soaps.Active ingredients triclosan and triclocarban, as well as 17 other commonly used ingredients[3], can no longer be put on the market. If you’re worried this was some sort of kneejerk reaction based on fear and not legitimate concerns, you shouldn’t be. Three years ago, the FDA told the companies that make and sell these products to prove their safety and effectiveness, but the FDA was unconvinced. Personally, that seems like a good thing for all of us, and here’s why.Their products did more harm than ...
  • Monday, September 19, 2016 01:08 AM
    Drugmakers need to learn empathy and not try to defend price hikes that make drugs inaccessible, Andrew Witty, the chief executive of British pharmaceutical giant GSK, told CNBC. "In all circumstance, we need to be realistic and empathetic, we need to demonstrate better that we understand people are concerned about [drug pricing]," Witty told CNBC on the sidelines of the Singapore Summit 2016. "I'm not, for a second, going to sit here and defend any historical pricing position," he added. Drug prices have come under scrutiny in recent months after Mylan[1] received public backlash for the sharp price increases the ...
  • Tuesday, September 13, 2016 02:15 PM
    By Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A relatively rare abnormality in the makeup of germs in an infant's gut may triple the risk for allergies and asthma in childhood, new research warns. Millions of bacteria and fungi can be found in everyone's gut, but the new study suggests that an out-of-whack combination of bugs, present in less than 10 percent of newborns, may undermine immune system function. The result: A much higher risk for allergies by 2 years of age and asthma by age 4, the researchers said. "Previous studies from the last couple ...
  • Tuesday, September 06, 2016 03:50 PM
    An Ohio woman on Tuesday filed a proposed class action lawsuit against Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc (MYL.O) in an Ohio county court, claiming sharp price hikes for the company's EpiPen device violated the state's consumer protection law.Mylan has raised the U.S. price of EpiPen, which is used to treat life-threatening allergies, from less than $100 when it acquired the product in 2007 to more than $600, drawing criticism from parents, consumer groups and U.S. politicians.EpiPens automatically inject a dose of the drug epinephrine into the thigh to counter dangerous reactions to allergens such as peanuts, foods and bee stings. It has ...
  • Monday, August 29, 2016 08:56 AM
    Mylan will start selling a cheaper version of its EpiPen after absorbing waves of criticism[1] over a list price for the emergency allergy treatment that has grown to $608 for a two-pack, making it unaffordable for many patients without insurance or with high-deductible coverage.The drugmaker says it will make available in the next several weeks a generic EpiPen version that is identical to the branded option but will have a list price of $300 for a two-pack.It will be available in both 0.15-milligram and 0.30-milligram strengths, like the current version on the market.EpiPens are used in emergencies to treat severe ...
  • Sunday, August 21, 2016 07:00 AM
    Walking through the grocery stores, you might notice some new alternative foods popping up, including bean pasta, grain-free bread and nut cheeses. These aren’t just for vegans and people with food allergies— these new options are gourmet and healthy foodies everywhere are taking notice. “We have more people following gluten-free, dairy-free and vegan diets now, as well as the paleo trend,” said Frances Largeman-Roth, RD, author of “Eating in Color.” “There’s been a real shift in the market of what people are looking for.” This new spin on traditional foods isn’t just about eliminating ingredients, but adding something nutritious as ...
  • Sunday, August 14, 2016 11:52 PM
    Associated Press and staff reports 10:52 p.m. CDT August 14, 2016Dan Rohlfing hit a two-run single in the fourth inning, leading the Reno Aces to a 6-3 win over the Sounds on Sunday night at First Tennessee Park.The Sounds (70-52) still have a double digit game lead in the Pacific Coast League’s American Southern Division with 22 games to play.Rohlfing’s hit capped a three-run inning and gave the Aces a 4-2 lead after Peter O’Brien scored on a ground out earlier in the inning.The Aces later tacked on two runs in the sixth when Zach Borenstein hit an RBI single ...
  • Friday, August 05, 2016 12:11 PM
    The Nashville Emerging Leader Awards celebrate our city's top young talent.(Photo: Submitted)Want to know who Nashville's next up-and-comers are?Here are a few to watch.For 10 years, the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce[1] and YP Nashville[2] have recognized young professionals in our city who have excelled in their career and positively impacted our community with Nashville Emerging Leader Awards[3].On Thursday, the 10th annual NELAs honored a diverse group of 15 award winners out of 75 finalists for what they have done and will do for Nashville.Mark McNeely[4], senior partner at public relations firm McNeely, Pigott and Fox[5], also received the 2016 Impact Award for his ...
  • Friday, July 29, 2016 06:00 AM
    Photo Credit Bob Staake Getting sick can put a damper on any vacation, but it can be especially unsettling and even scary when it happens in another country. Here, Matthew Klapetzky, a registered nurse and the clinical director of Passport Health[1], the travel clinic at the University of Rochester School of Nursing, shares tips on what to do if illness hits you while abroad.Pack a First-Aid Kit“The majority of minor health issues that international travelers contend with can easily be self-treated with a good first-aid kit,” Mr. Klapetzky said. It should include an anti-diarrhea medication such as Imodium A-D or ...
  • Wednesday, July 20, 2016 04:56 PM
    USA Hockey announced today that the Nashville Predators and the Nashville Sled Preds will host the seventh annual USA Hockey Sled Classic, presented by the NHL. The four-day event will take place November 17-20, 2016, at the Ford Ice Center, operated by the Nashville Predators to continue the growth of hockey and skating in Middle Tennessee, in Antioch, Tenn.First staged in 2010, the USA Hockey Sled Classic is an annual round-robin format tournament between NHL-affiliated sled hockey teams. All competing teams represent their affiliated NHL club by wearing official NHL licensed jerseys with local club marks and logos. Over 20 NHL ...
  • Monday, July 11, 2016 12:03 AM
    Babies have been seen sucking on their fingers in utero[1] weeks before birth. But the sight of an older child with his fingers constantly in his mouth, sucking her thumb, biting his nails, can drive parents crazy, bringing up fears about everything from social stigma to germs.A new study suggests that those habits in children ages 5 to 11 may indeed increase exposure to microbes, but that that may not be all bad.When a pediatrician discusses thumb-sucking, it’s usually because a parent is worried. The thumb is in the mouth so constantly that there’s a worry about speech or about ...
  • Thursday, July 07, 2016 10:01 AM
    PhotoCredit Andreas SamuelssonThe Challenge: A 43-year-old man starts to cough every time he takes a deep breath. Can you help him figure out why?Every month, the Diagnosis column of The New York Times Magazine asks Well readers to try their hand at solving a medical mystery. Below you will find the story of a healthy middle-aged man who starts coughing and just can’t stop. He can’t exercise. He can’t laugh. Sometimes he can’t even talk without interrupting himself with deep, awful-sounding hacks.Below I provide much of the information available to the doctors who examined him. It took 18 months before ...
  • Wednesday, June 29, 2016 08:46 PM
    The Nashville Predators acquired P.K. Subban from the Montreal Canadiens in exchange for Shea Weber on Wednesday in a blockbuster swap of All-Star defensemen two days before free agency opens. Subban won the Norris Trophy as the NHL's top defenseman in 2013 and had six goals and 45 assists last season before suffering an injury. The offensive-minded, dynamic 27-year-old has 63 goals and 215 assists in 434 career games, all with the Canadiens. He said he was not surprised by the trade because there had been so many rumors since he signed a $72 million, eight-year contract in the summer ...
  • Friday, June 17, 2016 03:00 AM
    WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Up to 40 percent of children in the United States have nasal allergies[1], the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.These kids likely have persistent sneezing[2], along with a stuffy or runny nose[3]. These symptoms -- known as allergic rhinitis[4] -- are more likely to develop if one or both parents have allergies[5], the agency noted.Nasal allergies[6] can be caused by outdoor allergens such as plant pollens (seasonal allergies) or indoor allergens[7] such as mold[8], dust mites and pet dander.If your child has seasonal allergies, pay attention to pollen[9] counts and try to keep ...
  • Tuesday, May 31, 2016 11:28 PM
    When Trisha Yearwood was asked to throw out the first pitch at a Nashville Sounds game this season, the country star began dusting off her high school softball skills, practicing with her husband, Garth Brooks, and her nephew.        
  • Monday, May 23, 2016 09:10 AM
    US Bank provided a loan to… more[1] Brandon Jenkins, founder and… more[2] courtesy of Brandon Jenkins The apartment complex 3rd & Madison, at 1212 Third Ave. N., will contain 101 units and is… more[3] Construction starts today on yet another apartment complex in Germantown, but the size of this one makes it different than the others proposed in the high-profile neighborhood immediately north of downtown Nashville. Upcoming Events Featured Jobs The $28 million complex will contain 101 apartments at 1212 Third Ave. N. That is a few blocks from First Tennessee Park, where the Nashville Sounds play minor-league baseball and ...
  • Monday, May 16, 2016 11:00 AM
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  • Tuesday, May 10, 2016 01:14 AM
    Viktor Arvidsson's first playoff goal of his young career certainly is a moment to remember. The rest of the Nashville Predators are just grateful he scored so quickly after surviving a triple-overtime thriller in Game 4.Arvidsson scored 2:03 into overtime, and the Predators forced a deciding seventh game for their second straight series by beating the San Jose Sharks 4-3 on Monday night."That was the second most exciting part of him scoring was that it was in the first three minutes," Predators left wing Colin Wilson said. "We get to get to bed at a regular time. It's big to ...
  • Wednesday, April 27, 2016 02:26 AM
    The NHL and NBA have their playoffs at roughly the same time. When it comes to nail-biters, it's no contest in terms of volume. The Anaheim Ducks will host the Nashville Predators on Wednesday night (10 p.m. EDT, NBCSN) as they close out the first round with a Game 7 - the 40th in the league since 2009. Over the last seven-plus postseasons, the NHL has had 35 Game 6s, 24 Game 5s and just 14 sweeps. In that same time, the NBA has had 21 Game 7s along with 21 sweeps, according to STATS, while 27 series have gone ...
  • Wednesday, April 20, 2016 04:00 PM
    Portland, Ore.-based food manufacturer Harry’s Fresh Foods plans to open a Nashville facility in the third quarter of 2016, eventually creating 302 jobs, the company and state officials announced Wednesday.The 39-year-old company has a deal to take over the former Oberto Brands production facility at 2960 Armory Drive in South Nashville. Oberto announced it would close the facility in January, three years after the Seattle-based beef jerky manufacturer promised to create 310 jobs in Nashville to keep up with growing consumer demand.Owned by a subsidiary of Joshua Green Corp., Harry's Fresh Foods started selling clam chowder wholesale to restaurants in 1977. Today, the company ...
  • Wednesday, April 13, 2016 09:00 AM
    A bill to allow epinephrine auto-injectors to be available in public spaces just became law in Tennessee. The legislation was approved unanimously by the House of Representatives and Senate and has been signed by Governor Bill Haslam.Along with making epinephrine auto-injectors available in public spaces that attract groups of people and where exposure to allergens could pose a risk to those who know they have allergies and those who are unaware that they may be at risk for anaphylaxis (a severe, sometimes life-threatening, allergic reaction) has become law in Tennessee the legislation authorizes trained individuals as well as others acting ...
  • Wednesday, April 06, 2016 09:00 AM
    With spring and warmer weather now here, seasonal allergies are back. In fact, studies show that up to 30% of Americans suffer from seasonal allergies.What can you do to protect yourself from seasonal allergies this year? In this video, Dr. John Day shares three ways to beat seasonal allergies.1. Avoid your triggers.Learn what works and what doesn't work for you. Everyone is different.For some people, avoiding your triggers could mean staying inside on windy, high mold or high pollen days. For others, it could be avoiding certain foods. Change your filters in your home regularly and use a HEPA air ...
  • Sunday, April 03, 2016 09:02 PM
    BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee 8:02 p.m. CDT April 3, 2016Now that spring has arrived, it’s time to explore some fun things to do in Nashville.(Photo: Ben Finch/for BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee)Now that the weather’s getting warmer, it’s time to get out of the house and explore Nashville. From the Harpeth River to the Adventure Science Center to Warner Parks, the Nashville area offers plenty of family-friendly fun for all ages.So pack a healthy lunch, get the kids in the car and enjoy spring in Nashville by heading to one of these nearby destinations.Float the HarpethThe Harpeth River snakes 125 miles through ...
  • Monday, March 28, 2016 02:17 AM
    Spring can be known as a time of rebirth. After a long winter where everything is hibernating and often covered in a blanket of snow, spring can provide people with the hope that better things are on the way. Unfortunately, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, about 50 million people in the United States suffer from nasal allergies. For this group of people, spring can mean a season of sneezing and wheezing. Luckily, there is a wealth of information available about allergies. However, not all information is true and can even be misleading. Dr. Matthew Oliverio of ...
  • Monday, March 21, 2016 10:00 AM
    For some, spring is associated with warm, sunny temperatures. But for others, it's a reminder to break out the tissue box as allergy season is just ahead.Dr. Natalie Azar joins TODAY Monday for "Spring It On," a new series to help you reboot your routines and daily rituals ahead of spring.While we can't be certain about the severity of this upcoming pollen season, we can start to take necessary precautions in light of the warmer weather — especially since the sniffles and itchy eyes may be on their way one week earlier than normal this year.RELATED: Can allergies cause stomach ...
  • Monday, March 14, 2016 10:00 AM
    Spring allergy season is blowing in early in many parts of the U.S. this year, with certain areas reporting pollen increases a good month sooner than usual. To avoid the sneezing, itching and wheezing, get a jump on treatments early, allergy experts told CBS News.Climate change is part of what's driving more sniffles, drippy eyes and asthma-related allergy symptoms ahead of the typical spring pollen season, said Dr. Anthony Montanaro, head of the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology at Oregon Health & Science University. A city or town's local topography and weather and the number of trees and plants ...
  • Monday, March 07, 2016 08:00 AM
    Evidence is accumulating that food allergies in children might be prevented by feeding peanuts and other allergenic food to infants in their first year of life, researchers reported here Friday.That finding would challenge the recommendation of the World Health Organization that babies be fed exclusively breast milk for the first six months of life.“At least as far as peanut is concerned, I would recommend parting from that,” Dr. Gideon Lack, professor of pediatric allergy at King’s College London, said in an interview.Dr. Lack was the senior author of a study last year that found feeding peanuts to young children starting ...
  • Monday, February 29, 2016 08:00 AM
    Legislation in the Tennessee General Assembly would allow epinephrine auto-injectors to be available in public spaces.        
  • Monday, February 22, 2016 10:14 AM
    On a recent trip to Tanzania with four grandsons, my most important task (beside protecting them from the jaws of a lion or leopard) was to keep them, and myself, in good health. It would not have been much fun to be stuck in a tent next to the commode or flattened on a cot while the rest of the gang viewed a dazzling array of wild animals from the safety of a Land Rover.Although I came prepared for the worst, I did everything I could to make our trip the best. And I’m happy to report, no one got ...
  • Friday, February 19, 2016 08:00 AM
    This El Nino Season has given us higher-than-average precipitation so far this winter, and there's still more to come! So with that comes the arrival of an early spring, with wildflowers and rolling green hills... But that also reminds you we are going to be heading into a tough allergy season!And if you're also like me, you want to avoid taking allergy meds that make you feel foggy. So how can you beat spring allergies? Here are my top 5 tips:Tip #1. Find some local honey.The theory is that the bees pollinate local flowers and create honey with the allergens ...
  • Thursday, February 11, 2016 03:34 PM
    PhotoDr. Maya Shetreat-KleinCredit Tanya MalottDr. Maya Shetreat-Klein has a message for the parents of small children: Don’t be afraid of dirt.She is a firm believer in the idea that children in Westernized countries today grow up in a world that can be too sanitized. They spend less time outdoors exploring nature and more time in front of screens than they did two decades ago. They eat foods that are heavily processed. Many do not know what it’s like to taste fresh, seasonally grown foods plucked from a garden with nutrient-rich soil.Dr. Shetreat-Klein, a pediatric neurologist in New York and an ...
  • Monday, February 08, 2016 12:55 PM
    We often associate winter with dehydrated skin[1] and chapped lips[2], but there are more health consequences of the season's frigid temps. Believe it or not, winter dryness can affect everything from your teeth to your throat and even contribute to the onset of the flu virus. Yuck. Luckily, there's a simple solution to these cold weather woes. Using a humidifier[3] at home can help combat winter's negative impact by adding moisture to your living environment. yocamon via Getty ImagesHumidifiers[4] release water vapor into the air, increasing the moisture levels of the surrounding environment. The devices generally come in two types, warm and cool[5].After consulting with ...
  • Friday, February 05, 2016 02:00 AM
    Title: New Drug Shows Promise Against Severe SinusitisCategory: Health NewsCreated: 2/3/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/4/2016 12:00:00 AM
  • Monday, February 01, 2016 10:00 AM
    Coughing, sneezing and itchy eyes aren't just allergy symptoms you see in the spring. Allergies can also strike during winter. Dr. Scott Phillips, an allergist at the Center for Ear, Nose, Throat and Allergy  with St. Vincent told us about changes you can make in your home that can help keep you feeling allergy-free.
  • Thursday, January 21, 2016 07:37 AM
    Melanie West, 63, has had a ringing in her ears as long as she can remember. When she was a kid in the ‘50s and ‘60s, it was a high-pitched sound in both ears that her doctors did not believe existed. “I would go from doctor to doctor explaining, ‘I hear this sound inside of my head, and it won’t let me sleep.’ I was having a hard time concentrating, and they would tell me that I don’t have it,” she says. When West was stressed, or hadn’t had enough sleep, it would get worse and her grades would plummet. ...
  • Tuesday, January 12, 2016 02:00 AM
    By Steven ReinbergHealthDay ReporterFRIDAY, Jan. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Flu[1] activity remains low in the United States, possibly due to the mild temperatures that have blanketed much of the nation, federal health officials said Friday.But officials expect flu activity to pick up in the next few weeks, so anyone who hasn't gotten a flu shot[2] should get one now."Flu is relatively low, but it's starting to increase and there is still time to get vaccinated," said Lynnette Brammer, an epidemiologist in the influenza[3] division at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.This year's slow start to the flu ...
  • Tuesday, January 05, 2016 08:00 AM
    Pollen season is a distant memory, you’ve long since shut car windows in favor of cranking the heat, and you haven’t seen an allergy commercial in what, four months?But if your nose is perpetually stuffy, your eyes itchy, and your head feels like it’s about to explode—you might just have winter allergies. Largely synonymous with indoor allergies, their symptoms tend to peak in the winter months but people often confuse their symptoms with that of a cold because they don’t have any problem with indoor allergens during the summer months, explains Neeta Ogden, M.D., a New Jersey allergist and spokesperson ...
  • Friday, December 25, 2015 02:00 AM
    By Steven ReinbergHealthDay ReporterWEDNESDAY, Dec. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although relatively few cases of flu[1] have surfaced so far in the United States, health officials expect activity to pick up in the next few weeks, so everyone who hasn't gotten a flu shot[2] should get one now."So far, influenza[3] activity this season has remained low," said Lynnette Brammer, an epidemiologist in the influenza division at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."We are seeing a mix of flu strains[4], but activity is still low, so it's a great time to go out and get vaccinated if you haven't ...
  • Thursday, December 17, 2015 08:14 AM
    You’ve washed your hands and taken vitamin C[1], but you still managed to catch your office cubemate’s germs. Part of avoiding a cold or the flu is knowing the facts. Colds[2] and flus are caused by viruses – not because you went outside in the cold, says Dr. Sandra Fryhofer, a practicing internist at Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta and a past president of the American College of Physicians. Almost as prevalent as cases of the cold and flu are these myths, which we've debunked to help you have a healthier season:1. The cold can turn into the flu.False. The common cold ...
  • Tuesday, December 08, 2015 04:52 PM
    Children who have asthma, hay fever or eczema may also have more risk factors for heart disease at a young age, as compared to kids who don't have these allergy-related conditions, a new study suggests.  Researchers found that kids with such allergies[1] had higher rates of being overweight or obese — risk factors for heart disease — than children who don't have these allergic conditions. The investigators also found that children and teens with asthma or hay fever were twice as likely to have high blood pressure or high cholesterol, which are also risk factors for heart disease, according to ...
  • Monday, November 30, 2015 08:37 AM
    Four out of five American adults commonly take over-the-counter medications, most often to treat ailments like aches and pains, coughs and colds, fever, allergies, skin disorders, and heartburn and other digestive problems. The reasons are easy to understand. O.T.C.s are convenient, readily available in groceries and big box stores as well as pharmacies, and they are less expensive than going to the doctor and perhaps paying for a costly prescription.According to the Food and Drug Administration, there are more than 300,000 over-the-counter drug products on the market, a number that continues to grow as an increasing number of medications move ...
  • Tuesday, November 24, 2015 02:00 AM
    SATURDAY, Nov. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- There are a number of steps people with allergies[1] and asthma[2] can take to deal with the challenges they may face over the holidays, an expert says."Two-thirds of allergy[3] sufferers have symptoms year-round, so it's not just a matter of the first freeze hitting and your symptoms disappearing," Dr. Bryan Martin, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), said in a college news release."Even after the pollen[4] season dies down, there are environmental triggers to deal with -- things like mold[5], dust and pet dander. The winter holidays can ...
  • Monday, November 02, 2015 01:20 PM
    Good news for dog lovers. A new study[1] shows exposure to dogs or farm animals at a young age is linked to a lower risk for childhood asthma at age 6.In the study, published Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, researchers looked at over 376,600 preschool age and over 276,200 school age students and found a possible benefit to being around animals early on.Exposure to dogs (having a parent who was a registered dog owner) during the first year of life was linked to a 13% lower risk of asthma in school age children, and farm animal exposure was linked ...
  • Wednesday, October 21, 2015 06:00 AM
    For individuals with food allergies or dietary restrictions, grocery shopping can be especially tedious as each item’s ingredient list and nutrition label must be carefully studied. Now, an app called “ipiit” is offering a solution to save time and help make healthier choices. The app allows users to scan the barcodes of foods they’re interested in and uses visual symbols to indicate whether or not a product is good for the individual’s health needs. Users first create a profile, listing the foods they are allergic to or would like to avoid because of dietary needs, such as wheat or artificial ...
  • Sunday, October 11, 2015 11:00 PM
    By Adam Collison, Elizabeth Percival, Joerg Mattes, and Rani Bhatia of the University of Newcastle. This story was originally published by The Conversation[1]. Allergies are reactions caused by the immune system as it responds to environmental substances that are usually harmless to most people. They may occur in response to a range of different material (called allergens), such as food, pollen, dust mites, animals, insect stings, or medicines. An allergy can affect different parts of the body[2]. Allergic rhinitis, or hay fever, for instance, affects the nose and eyes, while eczema affects the skin. Food allergies affect the gut, skin, airways, lungs, ...
  • Thursday, October 08, 2015 06:01 AM
    For the first two-thirds of the 2014-15 season, the Nashville Predators were the surprise of the NHL.New coach Peter Laviolette, armed with additions made by longtime general manager and C.G.B. Spender look-alike David Poile, transformed the long staid and steady Preds into a team that finally utilized its underrated speed to its offensive advantage, like a Paul Westhead Loyola team on skates.If the old Preds were sludge metal — technically proficient at what they did, though what they did was a bit of a slog — these new ones were Glenn Tipton and K.K. Downing playing "Flight of the Bumblebee" ...
  • Monday, September 21, 2015 11:00 AM
    Parkside Builders plans to start construction next week on Walden Village, a residential development with 34 cottages and townhomes on the south side of Trevecca Nazarene University's campus on Murfreesboro Pike.The Nashville-based homebuilder paid the university $950,000 for 3.5 acres on Nance Lane where it plans the homes that will sell for between $213,900 and $254,900."It's all about creating a community around an urban campus," Parkside Vice President Randy Chastain said about Walden Village and other potential future developments the homebuilder hopes to pursue with Trevecca.Near the Walden Village site, Trevecca is negotiating with another developer to build an apartment building as part of a separate 3.5-acre development facing Parris Avenue.Walden Village will be built in two phases with all but six ...
  • Friday, September 18, 2015 08:00 AM
    As Congress prepares to review and reauthorize child nutrition programs, the USDA’s just released2014 report on food insecurity reveals that 15.3 million children in the U.S. did not receive enough food last year for an active, healthy lifestyle. Those findings, essentially unchanged from 2013, show that childhood hunger remains a significant problem in the U.S.The existing legislation relating to child nutrition, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, is set to expire on Sept. 30. Reauthorization of the legislation happens every five years and allows for improvements in the USDA’s child nutrition programs — programs that increase food security by ...
  • Tuesday, September 15, 2015 10:00 AM
    The St. Jude Country Music Marathon & Half Marathon is changing its tune.After 16 years, the name of the race was changed Monday.Officials said the annual event is now the St. Jude Rock ‘n’ Roll Nashville Marathon & Half Marathon.Josh Furlow, president of the Competitor Group, Inc. which owns the event, said the reason for the name change was to further integrate the event into the company’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon global series, which includes a total of 30 cities.For instance, some of the other names in the series are the Suja Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego Marathon, Humana Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicago ...
  • Thursday, September 10, 2015 11:00 AM
    When looking at job growth, Nashville's economy came roaring out of the Great Recession.Employment in the Nashville metro area grew nearly 20 percent from 2009 to 2015, outpacing the region's overall population growth of 10 percent in that time period.That's good enough to rank third in the country during that time frame, according to a study by the Pew Charitable Trusts.In 2013, the Nashville area's economy officially crossed the $100 billion mark, a new benchmark for local growth. A report released by the federal Bureau of Economic Analysis ranks Nashville as the nation's 34th-largest economy.Why the momentum? A growing tech sector, a Southern shift in auto ...
  • Friday, September 04, 2015 10:00 AM
    Many more Tennesseans work in clean energy than you may realize. A new study shows that Tennessee is a leader in clean energy job creation, and recent policy developments could accelerate clean energy job growth significantly.The EPA recently released the final version of the Clean Power Plan, the first federal rule limiting existing power plants’ carbon dioxide emissions – the leading pollutant driving manmade climate change.This represents a giant leap in the right direction for Tennessee and the nation as a whole. The Clean Power Plan will lead America into a cleaner energy future with improved air quality and public health, along ...
  • Tuesday, September 01, 2015 09:03 PM
    The Nashville Sounds honored the 15 millionth fan in their 38-year history on Tuesday.        
  • Monday, August 31, 2015 05:00 AM
    When Chattanooga high school football player Peyton Cook took a helmet hit to his leg, it moved his kneecap from the front to the side. While undergoing extended treatments for the injury, Cook became fascinated with the process and decided he wanted to become a physical therapist.Thanks to Tennessee Promise and Cook's volunteer mentor, Amy Hicks, Cook will be working toward making his dream a reality at Chattanooga State Community College this fall. In fact, Hicks worked with a number of Cook's classmates looking to start their college careers."Having a small group to talk to has been helpful," Cook said. ...
  • Thursday, August 27, 2015 08:00 AM
    Not long ago, Walker Shell would have hesitated to drive down Southgate Avenue. Now he owns a home on the street, in the heart of the Wedgewood-Houston neighborhood a few blocks south of downtown Nashville."This was an area you didn't come to, like the Gulch 10 years ago," said Shell.Like the Gulch, once an empty industrial area that today is home to condos, restaurants and high-rise offices, Wedgewood-Houston is quickly redeveloping. The neighborhood, long home to a mix of industrial sites, warehouses and small homes, has become popular with artists, musicians and, more recently, homeowners like Shell."Before I moved, I ...
  • Tuesday, August 25, 2015 08:00 AM
    he office portion of the new Gulch Crossing mixed-use building at 1033 Demonbreun St. is roughly 70 percent leased after three new tenants signed up for space.At the building's grand opening on Monday, developer MarketStreet Enterprises revealed leases with Insight Global Inc., Nicol Investment Co. and Thompson Research Group.Jay Turner, MarketStreet's managing director, said the company's first Class A office building in the Gulch raises the standard of office culture in Nashville."Nashville continues to experience tremendous growth and, to maintain this momentum, we must attract new talent,” he said. "Gulch Crossing will be an invaluable addition to the Gulch and to Nashville’s business community."Overall, Gulch Crossing has 205,000 square feet of office space, 16,500 square feet ...
  • Friday, August 21, 2015 04:00 AM
    For Nashvillians who love to escape in nature, hundreds of acres of additional forest land and winding trails will soon be open....
  • Friday, July 31, 2015 08:00 PM
    RCA Studio A, the Music Row building that touched off a sweeping debate regarding the city's music landmarks and overall preservation policy, has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places.The National Park Service's listing, which was made official July 21 and announced on Friday, gives a decisive win to activists, led by Nashville piano rocker Ben Folds, who fought to save the studio from demolition. Folds leases the building's famous studio, where an array of superstars have recorded, including Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson and Miranda Lambert.Sharon Corbitt-House, Folds' co-manager and senior vice president of studio operations for Studio A, ...
  • Friday, July 24, 2015 05:00 PM
    Education leaders scrambled for months to get tens of thousands of high school seniors invested inTennessee Promise.But for the scholarship program to pass its most critical test, those students will have to do something more difficult than arrive on a college campus in four weeks.They’ll need to stay there.“History will judge us based on (if) these students persist and complete” their degrees, said Krissy DeAlejandro, executive director of tnAchieves, a nonprofit partnering with the state to administer Tennessee Promise. “If they stay three weeks and they don’t feel like they have all the tools they need to complete, then we’re ...
  • Friday, July 17, 2015 03:00 PM
    HCA has leased 120,000 square feet of space at computer maker Dell's campus at Murfreesboro and Donelson pikes, where it plans to relocate 400 technology and back-office employees and add 200 jobs.The hospital chain's move comes as an affiliate of Irvine, Calif.-based real estate investment and management firm LBA Realty on Thursday completed acquiring the overall 340,000-square-foot office complex. As part of that transaction, Dell is leasing back 65 percent of the overall space, which left the 120,000 square feet of space available for HCA.Separately, HCA also plans to move 500 administrative, development and finance employees with its physician services ...
  • Wednesday, July 15, 2015 05:00 PM
    Music City has a new open-air picking parlor overlooking the river.In about two weeks, Eric Church will open Nashville's new Ascend Amphitheater in Riverfront Park with back-to-back acoustic shows July 30 and July 31. Until then, crews will work to add finishing touches at the venue and the park, including more than 17,000 shrubs and flowers.Nashville Mayor Karl Dean hosted the first all-access media tour of the site Tuesday and said he "thinks it's beautiful.""The amphitheater is so critical having it here," Dean said. "This a great symbol for our city. This is a symbol of Nashville, which is creativity, ...
  • Wednesday, July 01, 2015 02:00 PM
    A local investment partnership has paid $6 million for 36 acres in The Nations, marking its first purchase in that fast-growing West Nashville neighborhood."They're in the process of planning for future development for the property," said Lee White, a broker with Nashville real estate and design firm Southeast Venture, who represented buyer R Manuel – Centennial in the deal. "They made an investment in the property for its potential for development."The four parcels near the intersection of 51st and Centennial Boulevard with street frontage at 5400 Centennial are part of the overall former 50-acre home of Bruce Hardwood Flooring. The ...
  • Wednesday, June 24, 2015 05:00 PM
    The Tennessee Titans have reached a naming rights deal with Nissan North America, and the team plans to name its home venue Nissan Stadium, according to sources familiar with the situation.While financial terms of the agreement weren't immediately available, sources indicate it's an exclusive 20-year partnership between the two parties.A press conference is expected to be held Thursday, when the deal will be officially announced, per sources.The rebranding of the Titans' stadium, known as LP Field since 2006, is expected to start immediately.Nissan is one of middle Tennessee's largest employers, and is a globally recognized automobile company. The Nissan Smyrna ...
  • Tuesday, June 09, 2015 03:00 PM
    Google Fiber has completed its design for building a fiber network in Nashville and is ready to begin construction.The company, which announced it was bringing ultra-fast, gigabit speed Internet to Nashville in January, said the map outlines where it will put 3,200 miles of fiber in Davidson County are ready."With the design of our Google Fiber network completed, you'll see us around town digging and stringing fiber cables so that we can deliver Google Fiber's super-fast Internet to the city," a Google spokesperson said in an emailed statement. "As we lay thousands of miles of fiber-optic cable throughout (Nashville), we'll ...
  • Wednesday, June 03, 2015 06:00 PM
    Country star Kip Moore is behind plans for a new skate park on Buchanan Street, a project neighborhood leaders consider as yet another sign of revitalization of that North Nashville community....
  • Friday, May 29, 2015 01:00 PM
    Nashville-area software developers gathered Thursday to watch Google's I/O conference in San Francisco. As part of the meetup, they heard from local Google employees about the company's growing presence in Nashville and were able to ask questions and share their own ideas.Here are a few takeaways from the event:1) Google Fiber has made some key hires for the rollout of its gigabit-speed network.Martha Ivester, an agent at Creative Artists Agency, has been named Google Fiber's city manager. Before joining the music industry, she was a general manager and brand director for Nike, and also has worked for Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard, ...
  • Tuesday, May 26, 2015 01:07 AM
    Area picking up steam with new community center, library branch and the Ford Ice Center         
  • Tuesday, May 19, 2015 03:00 PM
    The nearly 8.5 million visitors to national parks in Tennessee in 2014 spent $571.1 million, boosting the state's economy by $785.9 million, according to a new National Park Service report."The national parks of Tennessee attract visitors from across the country and around the world," said Stan Austin, NPS regional director, in a news release. "Whether visitors come to explore the great wild areas of Tennessee like Big South Fork National River and Recreational Area and Great Smoky Mountain National Park with their miles of hiking trails, or the number of historic parks which focus on the Civil War's impact telling ...
  • Wednesday, May 20, 2015 12:00 PM
    Astra Sharma was mobbed by her teammates in the doubles alley of Court 2 at Baylor's Hurd Tennis Center, having just wrapped up the third NCAA title inVanderbilt history.The fourth-seeded Commodores dethroned defending national champion UCLA with a 4-2 win Tuesday night in Waco, Texas."You feel fully alive in the moment when you're in these matches," said Vanderbilt coach Geoff Macdonald, who won the program's first national title in his 21st season. "It was an extraordinary team effort over the course of several months. It's been just an incredible group."All three of Vanderbilt's national championships have come in the past ...
  • Monday, May 18, 2015 02:00 PM
    AT&T begins offering its gigabit Internet service on Monday, making it the first provider of the highest speed connection available to residential and small-business customers.The GigaPower service will be available in areas in Nashville, Murfreesboro, Smyrna, Lebanon and Clarksville. Prices range from $120 per month for the highest possible speed Internet-only subscription to $180 per month for the company's U-Verse package including Internet, television and voice service.With the launch of GigaPower, AT&T becomes the first provider to enter the Nashville market. The company boasted its ability to offer the service less than one year after the plan was announced. Comcast ...
  • Thursday, May 14, 2015 12:00 PM
    Mayor Karl Dean’s administration is looking to acquire what is said to be around 600 acres in Southeast Nashville that could help fill the need for a long-awaited anchor park in the fastest growing part of Davidson County.Dean, who has led an aggressive open space initiative, is holding an announcement Friday morning near Cane Ridge High School with officials from Metro Parks and Recreation, The Conservation Fund and the Joe C. Davis Foundation.Metro Councilman Robert Duvall, whose District 33 includes the area, said his understanding is that the plan is to convert what could be around 600 acres into a ...
  • Monday, May 11, 2015 01:00 AM
    Here’s an all-too-familiar springtime scenario: The sounds of incessant sneezing and coughing echo throughout your office, and the force with which your coworker blows her nose rattles your desk. Peering over the cubicle wall, you see her swollen eyes and ruddy skin.It’s surprising, then, that after offering to find her an antihistamine or two, your coworker kindly refuses, explaining she doesn’t have allergies and it must just be the sniffles. Really, Cathy? Really? It’s the beginning of April and there’s an Elm right outside the window and you look like a sneezy, bloated tomato. Why you gotta ignore the allergy-elephant ...
  • Sunday, May 10, 2015 03:04 PM
    By Cari Nierenberg, Contributing WriterPublished May 07, 2015 Researchers analyzed the results from more than 20 previous studies and found that hay fever sufferers may get some benefits from using probiotics, improving their symptoms and quality of life. But the jury is still out about whether probiotics are actually an effective treatment for people with seasonal allergies, said lead author Dr. Justin Turner, an ear-nose-and-throat surgeon at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee. Additional high-quality studies are needed before doctors would recommend for or against using probiotics to help treat people with seasonal allergies, Turner said. Probiotics are bacteria ...
  • Friday, March 06, 2015 09:02 PM
    The Opinion Pages | Letter Medication Allergies MARCH 6, 2015 Inside Continue reading the main story Continue reading the main story Continue reading the main story Share This Page Continue reading the main story Continue reading the main story To the Editor: Re ÂœAre You Really Allergic to Antibiotics?, by Victoria Dooley (Op-Ed, March 3): The most important course of action for anyone who has antibiotic or any medication allergy is to seek the expertise of an allergy and immunology physician. In addition to penicillin skin testing, we also offer drug desensitization, a procedure that allows us to safely introduce ...
  • Tuesday, February 24, 2015 12:00 PM
    Add one more woe related to winter: Nosebleeds.If you find yourselves getting nosebleeds every time winter rolls along, there’s a reason: Cold weather is drying and irritating to the nose, says Dr. Barry Shapiro, an ear, nose and throat specialist withWESTMED at Ridge Hill in Yonkers.People of all ages are vulnerable to winter nosebleeds. But you may be more prone to nosebleeds if you’re on blood thinners, have a deviated septum, suffer from nasal irritation or are living with a chronic disease.If you get frequent nosebleeds, it’s important to see an ENT specialist, who may need to cauterize a single ...
  • Saturday, February 07, 2015 01:00 PM
    CHICAGO --An estimated 31 million Americans suffer from sinusitis, a condition that causes headaches, congestion, sore throat and fatigue. Until now patients only had two treatment options: harsh medications or major surgery. Now there's a new solution. Andrea Leighton loves staying fit, and prefers to exercise outdoors. But for 15 years, symptoms of sinusitis put a damper on her active lifestyle. "Basically, I stuck cold ice packs on my head for an entire day and spent the day in bed," Leighton says.Until now, patients like Leighton were treated with steroids, antibiotics, or major surgery. Dr. Jerome Hester is offering his ...

Nashville ENT & Allergy

4230 Harding Road, Suite 400
Nashville,  TN 37205
Phone: (615) 386-9089